If you run tasks that take a long time to complete, the default timeout period on the remote site might elapse before the task completes. You can configure additional timeouts to allow long-running tasks to finish.

About this task

A long-running task might be the test recovery or cleanup of a large virtual machine. If a virtual machine has large disks, it can take a long time to perform a test recovery or to perform a full recovery. The default timeout period monitors the connectivity between the sites, so if a task takes a longer time to complete than the default timeout period and does not send notifications to the other site while it is running, timeouts can result. In this case, you can add a setting in the vmware-dr.xml configuration file so that Site Recovery Manager does not timeout before a long-running task finishes.

By adding the <RemoteManager><TaskDefaultTimeout> setting to vmware-dr.xml, you configure an additional timeout period for tasks to finish on the remote site. You can also configure a <TaskProgressDefaultTimeout> setting, to extend the time that Site Recovery Manager gives to a task if it reports its progress at regular intervals.

If you configure a <TaskDefaultTimeout> period, the default timeout does not cause tasks to fail, even if they take longer to complete than the period that the <DefaultTimeout> setting defines. As long as Site Recovery Manager continues to receive task progress notifications from the remote site, long-running tasks such as test recovery or cleanup of large virtual machines do not time out.

The initial call to start a task is subject to the <DefaultTimeout> setting. After they start, long-running tasks are subject to the <TaskDefaultTimeout> setting. If a task has not finished when <TaskDefaultTimeout> expires, the progress monitor checks whether the task has sent any progress notifications. If the task has sent notifications, the progress monitor applies the <TaskProgressDefaultTimeout> setting to allow the task more time to finish. When <TaskProgressDefaultTimeout> expires, the progress monitor checks for progress notifications again. If the task has sent progress notifications, the progress monitor gives the task more time. The sequence repeats until the task finishes or until it stops sending progress notifications.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the Site Recovery Manager Server host.
  2. Open the vmware-dr.xml file in a text editor.

    You find the vmware-dr.xml file in the C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager\config folder.

  3. Locate the <RemoteManager> element in the vmware-dr.xml file.

    The default timeout for startign all tasks on the remote site is 900 seconds, or 15 minutes.

    <RemoteManager>
     <DefaultTimeout>900</DefaultTimeout>
    </RemoteManager>
  4. Add a <TaskDefaultTimeout> element inside the <RemoteManager> tags.

    Set the <TaskDefaultTimeout> period to a number of seconds that is greater than the <DefaultTimeout> period. <TaskDefaultTimeout> has no maximum limit.

    <RemoteManager>
     <DefaultTimeout>900</DefaultTimeout>
     <TaskDefaultTimeout>2700</TaskDefaultTimeout>
    </RemoteManager>
  5. Add a <TaskProgressDefaultTimeout> element inside the <RemoteManager> tags.

    The <TaskProgressDefaultTimeout> must be at least 1/100th of the <TaskDefaultTimeout> period. If you set a period that is less than 1/100th of the <TaskDefaultTimeout> period, Site Recovery Manager silently adjusts the timeout.

    <RemoteManager>
     <DefaultTimeout>900</DefaultTimeout>
     <TaskDefaultTimeout>2700</TaskDefaultTimeout>
     <TaskProgressDefaultTimeout>27</TaskProgressDefaultTimeout>
    </RemoteManager>
  6. Save and close the vmware-dr.xml file.
  7. Restart the Site Recovery Manager Server service to apply the new settings.