A VMware vSphere Distributed Switch™ (VDS) acts as a single virtual switch across all associated hosts in the data cluster. This setup enables VMs to maintain a consistent network configuration as they migrate across multiple hosts.

For on-premise Site A, VDS SiteA-10g-dVS uses 4 x 10GbE adapters per host

  • 2 x 10GbE uplinks for VM traffic
  • 2 x 10GbE uplinks for VMkernel non-VM traffic—for example, management, VMware vSphere vMotion®migration, and so on

 

 

A port group defines properties regarding security, traffic shaping, and network adapter teaming.

The following distributed switch port groups were created for Oracle RAC and Oracle Data Guard traffic to balance traffic across the available uplinks:

  • Port group DPortGroup-10G with VLAN ID 1363 is for VM user traffic with two active/active uplinks set to “Route based on originating virtual port.”
  • Port group DPortGroup-OraclePrivate with VLAN ID 71 is for Oracle RAC interconnect traffic with two active/active uplinks set to “Route based on originating virtual port”

 

For on-premise Site B, VDS SiteB-10g-dVS uses 2x 10GbE adapter and 2 x 1GbE adapter per host

  • 2 x 10GbE uplinks for VM traffic
  • 2 x 1GbE uplinks for VMkernel non-VM traffic—for example, management, VMware vSphere vMotion®migration, and so on

 

Figure : Site B vSphere Distributed Switch Port Group Configuration

 

The following distributed switch port groups were created for on-premise Oracle RAC and Oracle Data Guard traffic to balance traffic across the available uplinks:

  • Port group DPortGroup-1363 with VLAN ID 1363 is for VM user traffic with two active/active uplinks set to “Route based on originating virtual port.”
  • Port group DPortGroup-OraclePrivate with VLAN ID 72 is for Oracle RAC interconnect traffic with two active/active uplinks set to “Route based on originating virtual port.”

 

For VMware Cloud on AWS, VDS vmc-dvs is as shown below

Figure :vSphere Distributed Switch Port Group Configuration

 

 

 

To create a logical network, navigate to the VMware Cloud on AWS Portal, click on ‘Networking & Security’ . Click on ‘Segments’. Click on ‘Add         Segments’.

Figure : Logical Network details

 

Fill in the required details as shown above. Pick ‘Routed’ option and specify the CIDR block of the segment in the Gateway/Prefix Length field. Click ‘Save’ when done.




Figure : Logical Network ‘OraclePrivate’

 

More information on VMware Cloud on AWS logical networks can be found  here.
 

The following distributed switch port groups were created for Oracle VM traffic between on-premises site A and VMware Cloud on AWS:

  • Port group BCA-L2VPN for L2VPN for VM user traffic – This enables VMs to keep the same subnet when migrating from on-premises data centers to the cloud and back.
  • Port group BCA-VPN-Network for VPN for VM traffic – This enables VMs to communicate—or ping each other—without being on the same subnet.

 

vSphere vMotion enables live migration of running—that is, powered on—VMs from an on-premises host to a host in VMware Cloud on AWS, with zero downtime for the application (less than 1 second switchover time), continuous service availability, and complete transaction integrity. Furthermore, by enabling certain advanced configurations,

vSphere vMotion migration between on-premises VMs and VMware Cloud on AWS can be enabled across various VDS versions.

 

Find more information here on live vSphere vMotion migration between on-premises data centers and VMware Cloud on AWS.

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