To support the use of Horizon Image Management Service (IMS) features in a first-generation Horizon Cloud environment, ensure that your system environment and components meet the following requirements.

Important: For additional important support and non-support information when using IMS features in a first-gen Horizon Cloud environment, review the Current Known Limitations and Issues of the First-Gen Release page.

Using this Page

Attention: This information applies solely when you have access to a first-gen tenant environment in the first-gen control plane. As described in KB-92424, the first-gen control plane has reached end of availability (EOA). See that article for details.

As of August 2022, Horizon Cloud Service - next-gen is generally available and has its own guide, Using Horizon Control Plane next-gen.

An indication of which environment you have, next-gen or first-gen, is the pattern that appears in the browser's URL field after you log in to your environment and see the Horizon Universal Console label. For a next-gen environment, the console's URL address contains a portion like /hcsadmin/. The first-gen console's URL has a different section (/horizonadmin/).

First-Generation Control Plane Requirements

For use of IMS in a first-generation Horizon Cloud environment, the first-gen tenant must be appropriately configured for use of Horizon Image Management Service. The admin console is dynamic and will display options for IMS-related workflows when the control plane account is configured with the appropriate features.

These control plane account settings might include enablement for use of:

  • Dedicated VDI desktops (sometimes referred to as persistent desktops)
  • Floating VDI desktops (sometimes referred to as non-persistent desktops)
  • App Volumes on Azure

When Using with First-Generation Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure Deployments

As described in the First-Gen Deployment Guide, these pods are based on the first-gen Horizon Cloud pod-manager technology and run in your Microsoft Azure subscription.

Pod requirements:
  • All of the first-gen tenant's pods on Microsoft Azure must be at manifest version 2632 or later.
  • Pods must be online and healthy before any imaging operations.
  • Pods must be in a single Microsoft Azure Active Directory (AAD) tenant.
Tenant requirements:
  • The tenant environment must be configured to use Universal Broker. See the Administration Guide, for information about setting up Universal Broker and end user assignments in a Horizon Cloud tenant environment.
  • Your tenant must be enabled for the Horizon Image Management Service features. If you want to verify with customer service that your tenant is enabled, you can open an informational (non-technical) service request (SR) as described in How to file a Support Request in Customer Connect (VMware KB 2006985).
Requirements for Microsoft Azure cores quota and public IP address provisioning for images sourced from Microsoft Azure Marketplace and managed on the Images (catalog) page:
  • Ensure that you have the required provision of CPU cores quota for the following compute sizes. If quota for the CPU cores are not sufficiently provisioned in your Azure subscriptions, the image management operations will fail with Microsoft Azure errors.
    • Standard_DS2_v2 for VMs without GPU and without Windows 11
    • Standard_D4s_v3 for VMs without GPU, using Windows 11
    • Standard_NV12s_v3 for VMs with GPU
  • Ensure that you have desktop subnets in the pod that allow a sufficient number of IP addresses. If the subnets are not sufficiently provisioned, then image management operations will fail with Microsoft Azure errors.
  • Ensure that you have the required number of public IP addresses provisioned in case you plan to use Microsoft Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) to access the base VM for any customization. If the public IP addresses are not sufficiently provisioned, the image management operations will fail with Microsoft Azure errors.
Service principal requirements:
  • You must either use the same service principal across all pods and subscriptions or each service principal must have read access to every Microsoft Azure subscription being used by the pods in your environment.

    Because the pods are likely to be in different subscriptions, the above requirement enables each pod subscription to have line of sight to all other pod subscriptions, which is necessary to create an image based on an image in an Azure Shared Image Gallery, regardless of the location of the pod on which the gallery resides.

  • Any custom role that you intend to use (instead of, for example, the contributor role) must have the requisite permissions as shown in the JSON file below.
    Note: The following JSON illustrates the permissions required for a Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployment including the five additional Microsoft.Compute/galleries/ permissions that IMS requires. See also When Your Organization Prefers to Use a Custom Role for the Horizon Cloud App Registration.
    For the steps required to create a custom role using a JSON file, see the Microsoft documentation topic Create or update Azure custom roles using the Azure portal and use the 'Start from JSON' option.
    "properties": {
            "roleName": "<Give a name say such as IMS-custom-role",
            "description": "Minimum set of Horizon Cloud pod required operations + Image Management functionality",
            "assignableScopes": [
                "/subscriptions/<Fill the subscription id>"
            ],
            "permissions": [
                {
                    "actions": [
                        "Microsoft.Authorization/*/read",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/*/read",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/availabilitySets/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/disks/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/images/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/locations/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachineScaleSets/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/snapshots/*",
                        "Microsoft.DBforPostgreSQL/*",
                        "Microsoft.KeyVault/*/read",
                        "Microsoft.KeyVault/vaults/*",
                        "Microsoft.KeyVault/vaults/secrets/*",
                        "Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers/*",
                        "Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces/*",
                        "Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups/*",
                        "Microsoft.Network/publicIPAddresses/*",
                        "Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks/read",
                        "Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks/write",
                        "Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks/checkIpAddressAvailability/read",
                        "Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks/subnets/*",
                        "Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks/virtualNetworkPeerings/read",
                        "Microsoft.Resources/subscriptions/resourceGroups/*",
                        "Microsoft.ResourceHealth/availabilityStatuses/read",
                        "Microsoft.Resources/deployments/*",
                        "Microsoft.Storage/*/read",
                        "Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/galleries/read",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/galleries/write",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/galleries/delete",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/galleries/images/*",
                        "Microsoft.Compute/galleries/images/versions/*"
                        "Microsoft.MarketplaceOrdering/offertypes/publishers/offers/plans/agreements/read"
                        "Microsoft.MarketplaceOrdering/offertypes/publishers/offers/plans/agreements/write"
                    ],
                    "notActions": [],
                    "dataActions": [],
                    "notDataActions": []
                }
            ]
        }
    }
Additional support considerations around images sourced from first-gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments
Refer to IMS Support for Images Sourced from First-Gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure Deployments. These sorts of additional considerations involve image-specific items such as use of Windows 11 as the guest operating system.

Microsoft Azure VMs - Generations Support Matrix in First-Gen Horizon Cloud

The following table details the support matrix for use of Microsoft Azure VM models Generation 1 VM, Generation 2 VM, with respect to guest operating systems Windows 10 and Windows 11.

Azure VM Model Windows 10 Windows 11
Generation 1 VM Supported Unsupported
Generation 2 VM Unsupported Supported

NSX Ecosystem Setup for NSX Agent Install During Image Version Publishing

In a first-gen Horizon Cloud environment, you will see an option to install the NSX agent during the publishing of an image version. However, because image operations are tenant-wide, you must have first set up a complete NSX ecosystem on all required pods on your tenant before you can use this option. Alternatively, you can have NSX set up on a limited number of pods and use this option when publishing to only those NSX-enabled pods. Before selecting the Install NSX Agent option during publish, ensure that all relevant NSX components are installed and configured on all pods to which you are publishing. Enable NSX Cloud networking and security features for assignments associated with this pod. See VMware Horizon Cloud Service Product Documentation for information about VMware NSX Cloud with Horizon Cloud pods in Microsoft Azure.
Note: You can only use this option if NSX Cloud version 3.1.1 or later is installed on the pod's virtual network. For NSX Cloud versions earlier than 3.1.1, configure the Microsoft Azure private DNS for NSX Cloud gateways as described in https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/81158 or the image publish will fail.

When Using with Horizon Pods in a First-Gen Environment

As described in the First-Gen Deployment Guide, these pods are based on the Horizon Connection Server software.

Currently, the supported Horizon deployment model for IMS in a first-gen tenant is the on-premises deployment type.

The following requirements apply to all of the currently supported deployment models, except where model-specific needs are indicated.

Horizon deployment software requirements:

Then, in context of the supported Horizon deployment models, ensure that the following items are met in the Horizon deployments supported by IMS that you intend to use with IMS:

  • Running Horizon Connection Server version 7.13 or later, with a valid license.
  • Deployed and configured according to the applicable Horizon Connection Server deployment information. For version 7.13, refer to Horizon 7 Documentation. For later versions, refer to VMware Horizon Documentation.
  • Connected to Horizon Cloud using a Horizon Cloud Connector version that provides support for IMS.

    Read on for the Horizon Cloud Connector requirements.

For more information about setting up a cloud-connected pod for use with IMS, see First-Gen Tenants - Getting Started with IMS.

Horizon Cloud Connector requirements specific to IMS support:

Even though support for IMS debuted with Horizon Cloud Connector version 1.8, that version is superseded by Horizon Cloud Connector version 2.1.2 and later.

It is most prudent to update to the most recent version of Horizon Cloud Connector to obtain the latest fixes and improvements.

  • If your deployment is running vCenter Server 7.0.3, Horizon Cloud Connector version 2.3.0 or later is required.
  • If your deployment is currently running Horizon Cloud Connector 1.8 or 1.9, VMware strongly recommends that you upgrade to the latest Horizon Cloud Connector version. However, if you intend to continue running with that old, superseded version and want to use the IMS features, be aware of the following points:
    • If that connector was deployed with the Basic Feature profile, IMS's Image Locality Service is inactive by default and you must manually activate the Image Locality Service. For details, see information about manually activating Horizon Cloud services for Horizon Cloud Connector in VMware Horizon Cloud Service Product Documentation
    • If that connector was deployed with the Full Feature profile, the Image Locality Service is activated by default.
vCenter Server requirements:

To support IMS functions, ensure that:

  • You are running vCenter Server 6.0 or later in all the deployment sites that you want to manage.

    To use vSphere content libraries for image replication and storage, IMS requires an appropriate version of vCenter Server.

  • All vCenter Server instances that you want participating in the IMS workflows must have network line-of-sight and authentication trust established with each other. You must manually configure the network line-of-sight and authentication trust.
    Note: IMS does not support a clustered topology, in which different groups of vCenter Server instances use different identity providers.
  • The vCenter Server user is configured with all the standard privileges required by a Horizon deployment. See information about privileges required for the vCenter Server user in VMware Horizon Documentation. In addition to these standard privileges, Horizon Image Management Service requires the following privileges:
    • Virtual Machine: All privileges in this group
    • vApp: All privileges in this group
    • Content Library: All privileges in this group (grant access to the vCenter Server user under Global Permissions)
    • Resource: Assign Virtual Machine to Resource Pool
  • The vCenter Server IP address or hostname listed in the vCenter Server certificate and thumbprint is also listed in Horizon Console. Follow the appropriate method to add vCenter Server instances to a VMware Horizon deployment. See VMware Horizon Documentation.

    Additionally, to use IMS with the Horizon pods associated with the vCenter Server environment, also observe the following guidelines:

    • If the vCenter Server certificate and thumbprint identifies the server name (common name/Subject Alternative Names) value of the vCenter Server by IP Address, then that IP address must be listed in Horizon Console also.
    • If the vCenter Server certificate and thumbprint identifies the server name value of the vCenter Server by hostname, then that hostname must be listed in Horizon Console also.
Image requirements:

To manage Horizon images using IMS in your first-gen Horizon Cloud tenant, observe the following requirements.

  • Verify that the latest Windows updates and system patches are installed on the images and that the installation process for these items is complete.
    Note: If any of these installations are still in progress when you attempt to publish an image, the agent installation can get stuck.
  • Verify that all Windows configuration (such as time zone, region, and keyboard layout) has been completed.
  • Verify that the latest version of VMware Tools is installed on the operating systems of the images.
  • Currently Horizon Image Management Service supports the management of images saved in the following formats: virtual machine (VM) templates and VM snapshots. The images must be resident on a vCenter Server instance.
  • Follow the standard and traditional Horizon guidance for preparing the image's guest Windows operating system for use in desktop pools. For example, to use a Windows Server operating system type as a single-session virtual desktop, the Horizon documentation states you must perform certain steps before the Horizon Agent is installed in the VM. For the standard Horizon guidance, refer to the information according to your pod's Connection Server software version:
  • Before using the service, prepare the source image in the format required by your use case.
    • A VM template is a copy of a virtual machine that you can use to create automated desktop pools containing full virtual machines. For information about creating a VM template on vCenter Server, see VMware vSphere Documentation.
    • A VM snapshot is a vCenter Server object that captures the state and data of a parent virtual machine at the time you take the snapshot. You can use VM snapshots to create instant-clone desktop pools. For information on how to take a VM snapshot, see VMware vSphere Documentation.

First-Gen Tenants - IMS Support for Images Sourced from First-Generation Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure Deployments

This documentation page describes specific considerations for Horizon Image Management Service (IMS) support when you create and manage images sourced from first-generation Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments.

Attention: IMS provides this support only when all of the requirements for first-generation Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments are met. Refer to First-Gen Tenants - IMS System Requirements.

For additional information about available functionality, see First-Gen Tenants - Understanding the Image Management Workflow within a First-Generation Horizon Cloud Tenant.

Using this Page

Attention: This information applies solely when you have access to a first-gen tenant environment in the first-gen control plane. As described in KB-92424, the first-gen control plane has reached end of availability (EOA). See that article for details.

As of August 2022, Horizon Cloud Service - next-gen is generally available and has its own guide, Using Horizon Control Plane next-gen.

An indication of which environment you have, next-gen or first-gen, is the pattern that appears in the browser's URL field after you log in to your environment and see the Horizon Universal Console label. For a next-gen environment, the console's URL address contains a portion like /hcsadmin/. The first-gen console's URL has a different section (/horizonadmin/).

General Considerations

Note the following:

  • Images from Microsoft Azure are only published to pods in your Microsoft Azure cloud capacity.
  • Images from pods on Microsoft Azure must be VDI desktop images.
  • The workflow in which you manually create a VM in one of your Horizon Cloud pods and import it into IMS for publishing is also referred to as the custom VM workflow. If you use a VM model for that custom VM that is not one of the IMS default ones listed in the section Requirements for Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure Deployments, then when you subsequently use IMS to publish that image, the images that IMS creates and replicates to the other pods are always of the IMS default VM models.
Warning: After you publish an image sourced from a pod on Microsoft Azure and it is in its sealed state in Horizon Cloud, do not use the Microsoft Azure Portal to perform actions on that image VM or copies of it. Using the Microsoft Azure Portal to perform direct actions on a VM that is in the published state in Horizon Cloud is unsupported and will cause unexpected behavior. Always use the Horizon Universal Console to perform actions on sealed images.

Windows 11 Guest Operating Systems - Specific Considerations, Known Limitations, and Known Issues

The following considerations, limitations and issues have been identified for use of the Windows 11 Guest operating system with first-gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments.

Considerations
  • Pod must be running the manifest from v2204 release or later.
  • Golden images must be running Horizon Agent Installer v22.1.0 or later.
  • Support matrix of the support combinations of Gen 1 and Gen 2, Windows 11 and Windows 10:
    Azure VM Model Windows 10 Windows 11
    Gen 1 VM Supported Not Supported
    Gen 2 VM Not Supported Supported
Windows 11 Specific IMS Known Limitations
  • Manual import, also referred to as custom import, of a Windows 11 image requires you import the image from Azure Marketplace as the direct source. Importing from any other sources such as Shared Image Gallery (SIG), Azure Managed Images, Azure VM snapshot, and the like are currently unsupported.
  • vTPM is currently unsupported.
  • Use of Windows 11 with VMs running AMD drivers is currently unsupported.
Windows 11 Specific IMS Known Issues
  • When time zone redirection is enabled using GPO, flickering desktop and explorer process crashing occurs. See KB 88086 for details.

    Avoid the known issue by not enabling time zone sync GPO for Windows 11 multi-session VMs.

First-Gen Tenants - Known Limitations and Issues of IMS in a First-Generation Horizon Cloud Environment

This documentation page contains lists of the known limitations and issues applicable to using IMS in a first-generation Horizon Cloud environment. Review these lists as a best practice before you begin using IMS in a first-gen tenant.

Using this Page

Attention: This information applies solely when you have access to a first-gen tenant environment in the first-gen control plane. As described in KB-92424, the first-gen control plane has reached end of availability (EOA). See that article for details.

As of August 2022, Horizon Cloud Service - next-gen is generally available and has its own guide, Using Horizon Control Plane next-gen.

An indication of which environment you have, next-gen or first-gen, is the pattern that appears in the browser's URL field after you log in to your environment and see the Horizon Universal Console label. For a next-gen environment, the console's URL address contains a portion like /hcsadmin/. The first-gen console's URL has a different section (/horizonadmin/).

Using the Following Lists of Known Limitations and Issues

Use the following lists in conjunction with the two pages for the Horizon Cloud Service known limitations and known issues, which apply to Horizon Cloud Service overall.

Note: For IMS in a first-gen Horizon Cloud environment, the supported Horizon deployment model is the on-premises deployment type. For details on the requirements that must be met with the supported on-premises deployment type, see the page First-Gen - System Requirements of IMS in a First-Gen Horizon Cloud Environment.

Known Limitations - IMS and First-Gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure Deployments

Important: To be supported for use in first-gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments, all imported base images must be built from Windows-based VMs that are sourced from the Azure Marketplace. Even if you try an image obtained from other origins and the console does not prevent you from using it within the console's workflows, use of such images is unsupported.

If the image is running a Windows 11 operating system, in addition to the requirement to be directly sourced from the Azure Marketplace, the image cannot have been subsequently processed for it to be validly supported in first-gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments. Importing Windows 11 VM from any other sources such as Shared Image Gallery (SIG), Azure Managed Images, Azure VM snapshot, and the like is currently unsupported.

For additional considerations about supported combinations of Gen-1 and Gen-2 machines for the image-related workflows with first-gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments, which OSes are supported for which machine generation, refer to Support for Images Sourced from Pods on Microsoft Azure.

  • You cannot create single-pod VDI assignments with multi-pod images.
  • All pods on Microsoft Azure must be on the manifest version specified in First-Gen Tenants - IMS System Requirements or a later manifest version.
  • The maximum length for a VM name is 15 characters. Horizon creates the VM name by combing the image name with the image version. Both major and minor versions are included. Therefore, if the image name is azure-image and the version is 1.0, the VM name is azure-image-1-0. The image name can be up to 11 characters only if the major and minor versions are one character each, like 1.0 or 9.9. If the version number was 12.1 or 1.13, then the image name must be shorter to avoid error messages.
  • The currently supported Microsoft Azure Marketplace VM sizes are:
    • Standard_DS2_v2 for normal non-graphical workloads, non-Windows 11 OSes
    • Standard_D4s_v3 for normal non-graphical workloads, Windows 11 OSes
    • Standard_NV12s_v3 for graphical workloads, both Windows 11 and non-Windows 11 OSes for which GPU is supported with IMS
    • Standard_NV4as_v4 for graphical workloads and non-Windows 11 OSes.
  • Currently, the Azure GPU-capable NVv4 VMs that use the AMD Radeon Instinct graphics drivers are supported for use only when they are imported using the custom import method. The custom import method is also referred to as a manual import in this documentation. The automated Import Virtual Machine from Marketplace wizard does not provide this feature currently. To use manually imported VMs with IMS, use the Move to Multi-Pod Images feature after you have imported the VM and installed the agents in the VM.

    Also, the service does not currently support use of Windows 11 with these NVv4 VMs and the AMD Radeon Instinct graphics drivers. That use has not been qualified.

  • Support for Windows 11 has some known considerations, limitations, and issues. For those details, see Support for Windows 11 Guest Operating System - Considerations, Known Limitations, and Known Issues.

    These considerations, limitations, and known issues apply also to manual import of a VM and using that with IMS, also sometimes referred to as the custom image workflow. As described at the preceding link, IMS supports use of Microsoft Azure Gen-1 machines only with Windows 10 guest operating systems. IMS supports use of the Gen-2 machines only with Windows 11 guest operating systems.

  • The pod’s Microsoft Azure subscription must be within a single Microsoft Azure Active Directory (AAD) tenant.
  • Intermittently, image status might not match the underlying version status. Eventually, subsequent operations on the image correct the image status.
  • Related to actions from the console's Multi-Pod Images page, the following workflows and actions are not supported for images located in Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployments:
    • Publishing an image created with New Image or New Version actions from a pod of a higher version to a pod of a lower version.
    • Image expansion or the shrinking of available images on new pods added after publishing.
    • Altering or modifying publish options during the Republish action of a failed image.
    • Console buttons Enable, Disable, and Edit.
    • Migrating existing or legacy images on a pod version other than the manifest versions specified in First-Gen Tenants - IMS System Requirements.
  • Because systemic checks do not occur in the following situations, confirm that all prerequisites are met before you publish.
    • Prior availability of all the pods
    • The sufficiency of Microsoft Azure subscription quotas for compute core or public IPs
    • The capacity sufficiency of the subnets in the pods for holding on to the new IPs created as part of image copies
    • Microsoft Azure VMs are powered on. Otherwise Horizon Image Management Service might encounter an error while publishing the image. This situation is probable because Microsoft Azure VMs might be powered off due to a power policy setting.
  • Limited support is provided for recovering from image publishing errors that can occur during the processing of the Republish action. While the following situations are typical during republishing, the publishing process might not recover because of other unknown or unrecoverable states of the image.
    • The pod goes off line.
    • Due to the implementation of a power policy, Microsoft Azure turns off source or target image copies during the long haul operation of image replication. You can turn the image copies on again and attempt to republish the image copies.
    • Microsoft Azure quotas are exceeded.
    • Certain transient conditions, such as timeouts, may require another publishing attempt.
  • Frequently unpublishing and publishing an image can reduce the stability of the image due to the number of times Sysprep runs on the image.

Known Limitations - IMS and Horizon (Connection Server Type) Deployments in a First-Gen Horizon Cloud Environment

The supported Horizon deployment model currently is the on-premises deployment type.

Horizon pod deployments in locations other than on-premises deployments are currently unsupported.

The following limitations apply to use of IMS with those Horizon pod deployment models that IMS supports:

  • Horizon Image Management Service only supports vCenter Server authentication based on user name and password credentials.
  • During image publishing operations, you must prevent activities from occurring in vCenter Server that can cause guest VM migrations on the image's underlying VMs. Guest VM migrations that occur at the same time as image publishing operations on the VMs can affect the image publishing operations.
  • The system-default setting for concurrent operations on images is to have three import or publish operations in progress at a time. As an example, importing can be in progress for one image while publishing is in progress for two images. You can change the default on the console's General Settings page. Increasing the setting increases the time to complete the replication.
  • Horizon Image Management Service does not support the management of images for linked-clone workspace assignments. In addition, if you have Horizon View Composer on any pods you want to use with IMS, you must deactivate Horizon View Composer on those pods. You cannot publish images successfully when Horizon View Composer is enabled.
  • Horizon Image Management Service requires the privileges of the full, built-in Windows administrator to create a directory and install Horizon Agent on the virtual machines (VMs) cloned from managed images. For more information, see the following Microsoft documentation topic about the Microsoft Windows built-in administrator account.
  • In some situations, when an image is published, more than one image copy is created on the same Horizon pod and vCenter. The publishing process is not impacted. However, do not remove any of these copies from vCenter as they are necessary for proper functioning.
  • Certain options that can be selected in the Publish workflow with the Horizon pods are not supported for use in the Import, New Image, and New Version workflows. When using the console's Import, New Image, or New Version options, you cannot select a cluster, resource pool, datastore, or network. In this situation, the same parameters are used that were selected during the previous Publish operation. If the image is being imported for the first time, the system will select a cluster, resource pool, datastore, and network.

Known Issues - IMS and First-Gen Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure Deployments

During the image publishing process, a timeout error occurs and the VM remains powered on, and prevents the publish flow from successfully completing (2954270, 2962049)
This issue is the result of an issue in the Microsoft Azure hypervisor that occurs when running the sysprep step of the publishing process. The issue occurs in some Azure VM models. For additional details, refer to VMware Knowledge Base article KB88343.

Based on the Microsoft Azure team's recommendation, to provide a resolution for Horizon Cloud customers, the default Azure VM model used by the service's automated Import VM from Marketplace wizard is changed in the service's v2204 release to use the Standard_DS2_v2 model for the automated import of non-GPU Windows 10 VMs (both single-session and multi-session):

  • For single-pod images, the automation's default VM model is changed from the previously used Standard_D4_v3 VM model to use Standard_DS2_v2.
  • For multi-pod images, the automation's default VM model is changed from the previously used Standard_D2_v2 model to use Standard_DS2_v2.

As of the v2204 release, please include quota for the Azure DSv2-series in your pod's Azure subscriptions.

Publish and republish might occasionally fail with an AGENT_PAIRING or SYSPREP error. (270721)
The message indicates that the AGENT_PAIRING or SYSPREP step in the publish workflow might have errored out. In these situations, attempt the Republish action as described in Republish an Image Version Using the Horizon Universal Console, which sometimes results in recovery.
Publish might occasionally fail with the error "AGENT_PAIRING: Timed out after max retries”. (2741491)
In a multi-pod environment, at some point during the process of publishing the image version, you might find some or all image copies in a failed state, displaying the error message “AGENT_PAIRING: Timed out after max retries.” Perform the following workaround.
  • Restart the VM in the Microsoft Azure Portal and publish the image again.
  • If the publish does not succeed, log in to the VM manually, restart the VM, and re-publish the image.
An image being published on the Multi-Pod Images page might also temporarily appear on the Images page. (2683426)
When you publish an image, the image appears on the Multi-Pod Images page. However, the same image can also appear on the Images page for a brief period of time. You can ignore the in-transition appearance of the image on the Images page, which you cannot act upon and which disappears after a short period of time.

Known Issues - IMS and Horizon (Connection Server Type) Deployments in a First-Gen Horizon Cloud Environment

Image replication fails on publish with error 'Error reading entity from input stream' (2956616)
This issue is due to a failed API call from the Image Locality Service (ILS) in the Horizon Cloud Connector versions 2.2.x and earlier when used with deployments involving vCenter Server 7.0.3. The ILS supports Horizon Image Management Service (IMS) features.

This issue is resolved in Horizon Cloud Connector version 2.3.0 and later.

Pool creation fails when you use the console's feature to select the datastores and networks in the target pod's vCenter Server for the image copy (2982388)
For Horizon Cloud Connector versions 2.2.x and earlier, a known issue exists related to the console's feature for selecting the datastores and networks for the image copy. Due to this known issue, the system always selects E1000 NIC for the template that is created for publishing the image, and the pool creation fails.

This issue is resolved in Horizon Cloud Connector version 2.3.0 and later.