An uplink profile defines policies for the links from hypervisor hosts to NSX-T logical switches or from NSX Edge nodes to top-of-rack switches.

About this task

The settings defined by uplink profiles may include teaming policies, active/standby links, the transport VLAN ID, and the MTU setting.

Uplink profiles allow you to consistently configure identical capabilities for network adapters across multiple hosts or nodes. Uplink profiles are containers for the properties or capabilities that you want your network adapters to have. Instead of configuring individual properties or capabilities for each network adapter, you can specify the capabilities in uplink profiles, which you can then apply when you create NSX-T transport nodes.

You can use the default uplink profile if the NSX Edge installed on bare metal has one active uplink and one passive standby uplink. You can also create custom uplink profile for NSX Edge installed on bare metal.

Standby uplinks are not supported with VM/appliance-based NSX Edge. When you install NSX Edge as a virtual appliance, you must create a custom uplink profile rather than use the default uplink profile. For each uplink profile created for a VM-based NSX Edge, the profile must specify only one active uplink and no standby uplink.

Note:

That being said, NSX Edge VMs do allow for multiple uplinks, if you create a separate hostswitch for each uplink, using a different VLAN for each. This is to support a single NSX Edge node that connects to multiple TOR switches.

Prerequisites

Make sure you understand NSX Edge networking. See NSX Edge Networking Setup.

Each uplink must correspond to an up and available physical link on your hypervisor host or on the NSX Edge node.

For example, suppose your hypervisor host has two physical links that are up: vmnic0 and vmnic1. Suppose vmnic0 is currently being used for management and storage networks, while vmnic1 is currently unused. This would mean that vmnic1 can be used as an NSX-T uplink, but vmnic0 cannot. To do link teaming, you must have two unused physical links available, such as vmnic1 and vmnic2.

For an NSX Edge, tunnel endpoint and VLAN uplinks can use the same physical link. So, for example, vmnic0/eth0/em0 could be used for your management network and vmnic1/eth1/em1 could be used for your fp-ethX links.

Procedure

  1. From a browser, log in to an NSX Manager at https://<nsx-manager-ip-address>.
  2. Select Fabric > Profiles > Uplink Profiles and click Add.
  3. Enter the following information:
    • Uplink profile name

    • (Optional) Description

    • Teaming policy: Failover order or load balance source (default is failover order)

      • Failover order—From the list of active adapters, always use the highest order uplink that passes failover detection criteria. No actual load balancing is performed with this option.

      • Load balance source—Select an uplink based on a hash of the source Ethernet MAC address.

    • (Optional) Link aggregation groups (LAGs) using Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) for the transport network

    • Comma-separated list of active uplink names

    • (Optional) Comma-separated list of standby uplink names

      The active and standby uplink names that you create here can be any text to represent physical links. These uplink names are then referenced later when you create transport nodes. The transport node UI/API allows you to specify which physical link corresponds to each named uplink.

    • (Optional) Transport VLAN

    • MTU (default is 1600)

    For example:

Results

You can view the uplink profiles with the GET /api/v1/host-switch-profiles API call:

{
  "result_count": 2,
  "results": [
    {
      "resource_type": "UplinkHostSwitchProfile",
      "id": "16146a24-122b-4274-b5dd-98b635e4d52d",
      "display_name": "comp-uplink",
      "transport_vlan": 250,
      "teaming": {
        "active_list": [
          {
            "uplink_type": "PNIC",
            "uplink_name": "uplink-1"
          }
        ],
        "standby_list": [],
        "policy": "FAILOVER_ORDER"
      },
      "mtu": 1600,
      "_last_modified_time": 1457984399526,
      "_create_time": 1457984399526,
      "_last_modified_user": "admin",
      "_system_owned": false,
      "_create_user": "admin",
      "_revision": 0
    },
    {
      "resource_type": "UplinkHostSwitchProfile",
      "id": "c9e35cec-e9d9-4c51-b52e-17a5c1bd9a38",
      "display_name": "vlan-uplink",
      "transport_vlan": 100,
      "teaming": {
        "active_list": [
          {
            "uplink_type": "PNIC",
            "uplink_name": "uplink-1"
          }
        ],
        "standby_list": [],
        "policy": "FAILOVER_ORDER"
      },
      "mtu": 1600,
      "_last_modified_time": 1457984399574,
      "_create_time": 1457984399574,
      "_last_modified_user": "admin",
      "_system_owned": false,
      "_create_user": "admin",
      "_revision": 0
    }
  ]
}

What to do next

Create a transport zone. See Create Transport Zones.