Building from source

Regardless of the out of the box Supply Chain Package you’ve installed, you can provide source code for the workload from one of three places:

  1. A Git repository.
  2. A directory in your local computer’s file system.
  3. A Maven repository.

    Supply Chain
    
    -- fetch source                 * either from Git or local directory
      -- test
        -- build
          -- scan
            -- apply-conventions
              -- push config
    

This document provides details about each approach.

Note: To provide a prebuilt container image instead of building the application from the beginning by using the supply chain, see Using a prebuilt image.

Git source

To provide source code from a Git repository to the supply chains, you must fill workload.spec.source.git. With the tanzu CLI, you can do so by using the following flags:

  • --git-branch: branch within the Git repository to checkout
  • --git-commit: commit SHA within the Git repository to checkout
  • --git-repo: Git URL to remote source code
  • --git-tag: tag within the Git repository to checkout

For example, after installing ootb-supply-chain-basic, to create a Workload the source code for which comes from the main branch of the github.com/sample-accelerators/tanzu-java-web-app Git repository, run:

tanzu apps workload create tanzu-java-web-app \
  --app tanzu-java-web-app \
  --type web \
  --git-repo https://github.com/sample-accelerators/tanzu-java-web-app \
  --git-branch main

Expect to see the following output:

Create workload:
      1 + |---
      2 + |apiVersion: carto.run/v1alpha1
      3 + |kind: Workload
      4 + |metadata:
      5 + |  labels:
      6 + |    app.kubernetes.io/part-of: tanzu-java-web-app
      7 + |    apps.tanzu.vmware.com/workload-type: web
      8 + |  name: tanzu-java-web-app
      9 + |  namespace: default
    10 + |spec:
    11 + |  source:
    12 + |    git:
    13 + |      ref:
    14 + |        branch: main
    15 + |      url: https://github.com/sample-accelerators/tanzu-java-web-app

Note: The Git repository URL must include the scheme: http://, https://, or ssh://.

Private GitRepository

To fetch source code from a repository that requires credentials, you must provide those by using a Kubernetes secret object that the GitRepository object created for that workload references. See How It Works to learn more about detecting changes to the repository.

Workload/tanzu-java-web-app
└─GitRepository/tanzu-java-web-app  
                   └───────> secretRef: {name: GIT-SECRET-NAME}
                                                   |
                                      either a default from TAP installation or
                                           gitops_ssh_secret Workload parameter

Platform operators who install the Out of the Box Supply Chain packages by using Tanzu Application Platform profiles can customize the default name of the secret (git-ssh) by editing the corresponding ootb_supply_chain* property in the tap-values.yaml file:

ootb_supply_chain_basic:
  gitops:
    ssh_secret: GIT-SECRET-NAME

For platform operators who install the ootb-supply-chain-* package individually by using tanzu package install, they can edit the ootb-supply-chain-*-values.yml as follows:

gitops:
  ssh_secret: GIT-SECRET-NAME

You can also override the default secret name directly in the workload by using the gitops_ssh_secret parameter, regardless of how Tanzu Application Platform is installed. You can use the --param flag in Tanzu CLI. For example:

tanzu apps workload create tanzu-java-web-app \
  --app tanzu-java-web-app \
  --type web \
  --git-repo https://github.com/sample-accelerators/tanzu-java-web-app \
  --git-branch main \
  --param gitops_ssh_secret=SECRET-NAME

Expect to see the following output:

Create workload:
      1 + |---
      2 + |apiVersion: carto.run/v1alpha1
      3 + |kind: Workload
      4 + |metadata:
      5 + |  labels:
      6 + |    app.kubernetes.io/part-of: tanzu-java-web-app
      7 + |    apps.tanzu.vmware.com/workload-type: web
      8 + |  name: tanzu-java-web-app
      9 + |  namespace: default
    10 + |spec:
    11 + |  params:
    12 + |  - name: gitops_ssh_secret  #! parameter that overrides the default
    13 + |    value: GIT-SECRET-NAME     #! secret name
    14 + |  source:
    15 + |    git:
    16 + |      ref:
    17 + |        branch: main
    18 + |      url: https://github.com/sample-accelerators/tanzu-java-web-app

Note: A secret reference is only provided to GitRepository if gitops_ssh_secret is set to a non-empty string in some fashion, either by a package property or a workload parameter. To force a GitRepository to not reference a secret, set the value to an empty string ("").

After defining the name of the Kubernetes secret, you can define the secret.

HTTP(S) Basic-authentication and Token-based authentication

Despite both the package value and workload parameter being called gitops.ssh_secret, you can use HTTP(S) transports as well:

  1. Ensure that the repository in the Workload specification uses http:// or https:// schemes in any URLs that relate to the repositories. For example, https://github.com/my-org/my-repo instead of github.com/my-org/my-repo or ssh://github.com:my-org/my-repo.

  2. In the same namespace as the workload, create a Kubernetes secret object of type kubernetes.io/basic-auth with the name matching the one expected by the supply chain. For example:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Secret
    metadata:
      name: GIT-SECRET-NAME
      annotations:
        tekton.dev/git-0: GIT-SERVER        # ! required
    type: kubernetes.io/basic-auth
    stringData:
      username: GIT-USERNAME
      password: GIT-PASSWORD
    
  3. With the secret created with the name matching the one configured for gitops.ssh_secret, attach it to the ServiceAccount used by the workload. For example:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ServiceAccount
    metadata:
      name: default
    secrets:
      - name: registry-credentials
      - name: tap-registry
      - name: GIT-SECRET-NAME
    imagePullSecrets:
      - name: registry-credentials
      - name: tap-registry
    

For more information about the credentials and setting up the Kubernetes secret, see Git Authentication’s HTTP section.

SSH authentication

Aside from using HTTP(S) as a transport, you can also use SSH:

  1. Ensure that the repository URL in the workload specification uses ssh:// as the scheme in the URL, for example, ssh://git@github.com:my-org/my-repo.git

  2. Create a Kubernetes secret object of type kubernetes.io/ssh-auth:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Secret
    metadata:
      name: GIT-SECRET-NAME
      annotations:
        tekton.dev/git-0: GIT-SERVER
    type: kubernetes.io/ssh-auth
    stringData:
      ssh-privatekey: SSH-PRIVATE-KEY     # private key with push-permissions
      identity: SSH-PRIVATE-KEY           # private key with pull permissions
      identity.pub: SSH-PUBLIC-KEY        # public of the `identity` private key
      known_hosts: GIT-SERVER-PUBLIC-KEYS # git server public keys
    
  3. With the secret created with the name matching the one configured for gitops.ssh_secret, attach it to the ServiceAccount used by the workload. For example:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ServiceAccount
    metadata:
      name: default
    secrets:
      - name: registry-credentials
      - name: tap-registry
      - name: GIT-SECRET-NAME
    imagePullSecrets:
      - name: registry-credentials
      - name: tap-registry
    

For information about how to generate the keys and set up SSH with the Git server, see Git Authentication’s SSH section.

How it works

With the workload.spec.source.git filled, the supply chain takes care of managing a child GitRepository object that keeps track of commits made to the Git repository stated in workload.spec.source.git.

For each revision found, gitrepository.status.artifact gets updated providing information about an HTTP endpoint that the controller makes available for other components to fetch the source code from within the cluster.

The digest of the latest commit:

apiVersion: source.toolkit.fluxcd.io/v1beta1
kind: GitRepository
metadata:
  name: tanzu-java-web-app
spec:
  gitImplementation: go-git
  ignore: '!.git'
  interval: 1m0s
  ref: {branch: main}
  timeout: 20s
  url: https://github.com/sample-accelerators/tanzu-java-web-app
status:
  artifact:
    checksum: 375c2daee5fc8657c5c5b49711a8e94d400994d7
    lastUpdateTime: "2022-04-07T15:02:30Z"
    path: gitrepository/default/tanzu-java-web-app/d85df1fc.tar.gz
    revision: main/d85df1fc28c6b86ca54bd613f55991645d3b257c
    url: http://source-controller.flux-system.svc.cluster.local./gitrepository/default/tanzu-java-web-app/d85df1fc.tar.gz
  conditions:
  - lastTransitionTime: "2022-04-07T15:02:30Z"
    message: 'Fetched revision: main/d85df1fc28c6b86ca54bd613f55991645d3b257c'
    reason: GitOperationSucceed
    status: "True"
    type: Ready
  observedGeneration: 1

Cartographer passes the artifact URL and revision to further components in the supply chain. Those components must consume the source code from an internal URL where a tarball with the source code is fetched, without having to process any Git-specific details in multiple places.

Workload parameters

You can pass the following parameters by using the workload object’s workload.spec.params field to override the default behavior of the GitRepository object created for keeping track of the changes to a repository:

  • gitImplementation: name of the Git implementation (either libgit2 or go-git) to fetch the source code.
  • gitops_ssh_secret: name of the secret in the same namespace as the workload where credentials to fetch the repository are found.

You can also customize the following parameters with defaults for the whole cluster. Do this by using properties for either tap-values.yaml when installing supply chains by using Tanzu Application Platform profiles, or ootb-supply-chain-*-values.yml when installing the OOTB packages individually):

  • git_implementation: the same as gitImplementation workload parameter
  • gitops.ssh_secret: the same as gitops_ssh_secret workload parameter

Local source

You can provide source code from a local directory such as, from a directory in the developer’s file system. The tanzu CLI provides two flags to specify the source code location in the file system and where the source code is pushed to as a container image:

  • --local-path: path on the local file system to a directory of source code to build for the workload
  • --source-image: destination image repository where source code is staged before being built

This way, whether the cluster the developer targets is local (a cluster in the developer’s machine) or not, the source code is made available by using a container image registry.

For example, if a developer has source code under the current directory (.) and access to a repository in a container image registry, you can create a workload as follows:

tanzu apps workload create tanzu-java-web-app \
  --app tanzu-java-web-app \
  --type web \
  --local-path . \
  --source-image $REGISTRY/test
Publish source in "." to "REGISTRY-SERVER/REGISTRY-REPOSITORY"?
It may be visible to others who can pull images from that repository

  Yes

Publishing source in "." to "REGISTRY-SERVER/REGISTRY-REPOSITORY"...
Published source

Create workload:
      1 + |---
      2 + |apiVersion: carto.run/v1alpha1
      3 + |kind: Workload
      4 + |metadata:
      5 + |  labels:
      6 + |    app.kubernetes.io/part-of: tanzu-java-web-app
      7 + |    apps.tanzu.vmware.com/workload-type: web
      8 + |  name: tanzu-java-web-app
      9 + |  namespace: default
    10 + |spec:
    11 + |  source:
    12 + |    image: REGISTRY-SERVER/REGISTRY-REPOSITORY:latest@<digest>

Where:

  • REGISTRY-SERVER is the container image registry.
  • REGISTRY-REPOSITORY is the repository in the container image registry.

Authentication

Both the cluster and the developer’s machine must be configured to properly provide credentials for accessing the container image registry where the local source code is published to.

Developer

The tanzu CLI must push the source code to the container image registry indicated by --source-image. To do so, the CLI must find the credentials, so the developer must configure their machine accordingly.

To ensure credentials are available, use docker to make the necessary credentials available for the Tanzu CLI to perform the image push. Run:

docker login REGISTRY-SERVER -u REGISTRY-USERNAME -p REGISTRY-PASSWORD

Supply chain components

Aside from the developer’s ability to push source code to the container image registry, the cluster must also have the proper credentials, so it can pull that container image, unpack it, run tests, and build the application.

To provide the cluster with the credentials, point the ServiceAccount used by the workload at the Kubernetes secret that contains the credentials.

If the registry that the developer targets is the same one for which credentials were provided while setting up the workload namespace, no further action is required. Otherwise, follow the same steps as recommended for the application image.

How it works

A workload specifies that source code must come from an image by setting workload.spec.source.image to point at the registry provided by using --source-image. Instead of having a GitRepository object created, an ImageRepository object is instantiated, with its specification filled in such a way to keep track of images pushed to the registry provided by the user.

Take the following workload as an example:

apiVersion: carto.run/v1alpha1
kind: Workload
metadata:
  name: app
  labels:
    app.kubernetes.io/part-of: app
    apps.tanzu.vmware.com/workload-type: web
spec:
  source:
    image: 10.188.0.3:5000/test:latest

Instead of a GitRepository object, an ImageRepository is created:

  Workload/app
  │
- ├─GitRepository/app
+ ├─ImageRepository/app
  │
  ├─Image/app
  │ ├─Build/app-build-1
  │ │ └─Pod/app-build-1-build-pod
  │ ├─PersistentVolumeClaim/app-cache
  │ └─SourceResolver/app-source
  │
  ├─PodIntent/app
  │
  ├─ConfigMap/app
  │
  └─Runnable/app-config-writer
    └─TaskRun/app-config-writer-2zj7w
      └─Pod/app-config-writer-2zj7w-pod

ImageRepository provides the same semantics as GitRepository, except that it looks for source code in container image registries rather than Git repositories.

Maven Artifact

This approach aids integration with existing CI systems, such as Jenkins, and can pull artifacts from existing Maven repositories, including Jfrog Artifactory.

There are no dedicated fields in the Workload resource for specifying the Maven artifact configuration. You must fill in the name/value pairs in the params structure.

For example:

apiVersion: carto.run/v1alpha1
kind: Workload
metadata:
  name: my-workload
  labels:
    apps.tanzu.vmware.com/workload-type: web
spec:
  params:
  - name: maven
    value:
      groupId: com.example
      artifactId: springboot-initial
      version: RELEASE      # latest 'RELEASE' or a specific version (e.g.: '1.2.2')
      type: jar             # optional (defaults to 'jar')
      classifier: sources   # optional

The tanzu CLI is used for creating workloads that define Maven artifacts as source.

To create a workload that defines a specific version of a maven artifact as source, run:

tanzu apps workload apply my-workload \
      --param-yaml maven='{"artifactId": "springboot-initial", "version": "2.6.0", "groupId": "com.example"}'\
      --type web --app spring-boot-initial -y

To create a workload that defines the RELEASE version of a maven artifact as source, run:

tanzu apps workload apply my-workload \
      --param-yaml maven='{"artifactId": "springboot-initial", "version": "RELEASE", "groupId": "com.example"}'\
      --type web --app spring-boot-initial -y

The Maven repository URL and required credentials are defined in the supply chain, not the workload. For more information, see Installing OOTB Basic.

Maven Repository Secret

The MavenArtifact only supports authentication using basic authentication.

Additionally, MavenArtifact supports security using the TLS protocol. The Application Operator can configure the MavenArtifact to use a custom, or self-signed certificate authority (CA).

The MavenArtifact expects that all of the earlier credentials are provided in one secret, formatted as shown later:

---
apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: maven-credentials
type: Opaque
data:
  username: <BASE64>  # basic auth user name
  password: <BASE64>  # basic auth password
  caFile: <BASE64>    # PEM Encoded certificate data for custom CA 

You cannot use the tanzu CLI to create secrets such as this, but you can use the kubectl CLI instead.

For example:

kubectl create secret generic maven-credentials \
  --from-literal=username=literal-username \
  --from-file=password=/path/to/file/with/password.txt \
  --from-file=caFile=/path/to/ca-certificate.pem
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