The NSX Edge services gateways (ESG) implement load balancing in NSX for vSphere.

An ESG has both Layer 4 and Layer 7 engines that offer different features.

Feature

Layer 4 Engine

Layer 7 Engine

Protocols

TCP

TCP

HTTP

HTTPS (SSL Pass-through)

HTTPS (SSL Offload)

Load balancing method

Round Robin

Source IP Hash

Least Connection

Round Robin

Source IP Hash

Least Connection

URI

Health checks

TCP

TCP

HTTP (GET, OPTION, POST)

HTTPS (GET, OPTION, POST)

Persistence (keeping client connections to the same back-end server)

TCP: SourceIP

TCP: SourceIP, MSRDP

HTTP: SourceIP, Cookie

HTTPS: SourceIP, Cookie, ssl_session_id

Connection throttling

No

Client Side: Maximum concurrent connections, Maximum new connections per second

Server Side: Maximum concurrent connections

High availability

Yes

Yes

Monitoring

View VIP (Virtual IP), Pool and Server objects and stats via CLI and API

View global stats for VIP sessions from the vSphere Web Client

View VIP, Pool and Server objects and statistics by using CLI and API

View global statistics about VIP sessions from the vSphere Web Client

Layer 7 manipulation

No

URL block, URL rewrite, content rewrite

Table 1. NSX for vSphere Load Balancer Design Decisions

Decision ID

Design Decision

Design Justification

Design Implications

CSDDC-VI-SDN-023

Use the NSX load balancer.

The NSX load balancer can support the needs of the management applications. Using another load balancer increases cost and adds another component to be managed as part of the SDDC.

None.

CSDDC-VI-SDN-024

Use an NSX load balancer in HA mode for all management applications.

All management applications that require a load balancer are on a single virtual wire, having a single load balancer keeps the design simple.

One management application owner might make changes to the load balancer that impact another application.