Check your VLAN environment regularly to avoid addressing problems. Fully document the VLAN environment and ensure that VLAN IDs are used only once. Your documentation can help with troubleshooting and is essential when you want to expand the environment.

About this task

Procedure

  1. Ensure that all vSwitch and VLANS IDs are fully documented

    If you are using VLAN tagging on a virtual switch, the IDs must correspond to the IDs on external VLAN-aware upstream switches. If VLAN IDs are not tracked completely, mistaken reuse of IDs might allow for traffic between the wrong physical and virtual machines. Similarly, if VLAN IDs are wrong or missing, traffic between physical and virtual machines might be blocked where you want traffic to pass.

  2. Ensure that VLAN IDs for all distributed virtual port groups (dvPortgroup instances) are fully documented

    If you are using VLAN tagging on a dvPortgroup the IDs must correspond to the IDs on external VLAN-aware upstream switches. If VLAN IDs are not tracked completely, mistaken reuse of IDs might allow for traffic between the wrong physical and virtual machines. Similarly, if VLAN IDs are wrong or missing, traffic between physical and virtual machines might be blocked where you want traffic to pass.

  3. Ensure that private VLAN IDs for all distributed virtual switches are fully documented

    Private VLANs (PVLANs) for distributed virtual switches require primary and secondary VLAN IDs. These IDs must correspond to the IDs on external PVLAN-aware upstream switches. If VLAN IDs are not tracked completely, mistaken reuse of IDs might allow for traffic between the wrong physical and virtual machines. Similarly, if PVLAN IDs are wrong or missing, traffic between physical and virtual machines might be blocked where you want traffic to pass.

  4. Verify that VLAN trunk links are connected only to physical switch ports that function as trunk links.

    When connecting a virtual switch to a VLAN trunk port, you must properly configure both the virtual switch and the physical switch at the uplink port. If the physical switch is not properly configured, frames with the VLAN 802.1q header are forwarded to a switch that not expecting their arrival.