You can use vRealize Automation multi-machine services or vApps to group component machines.

Table 1. Comparison of Multi-Machine Service and vApp (vCloud) Features

vRealize Automation Multi-Machine Service

vApp (vCloud)

Create a multi-machine blueprint that references individual machine blueprints in vRealize Automation.

Use existing vApp templates created in vCloud Director or vCloud Air.

Provision machines of any type (virtual, physical, or cloud) as part of a service.

Provision virtual machines from vCloud Director or vCloud Air.

Use vRealize Automation to manage component machines of a multi-machine service.

Use vCloud Director or vCloud Air to manage vApp machines.

Application-specific networks can be defined in a multi-machine blueprint for vCloud Networking and Security and NSX.

Application-specific networks are defined in a vApp.

Component machines can be added or removed after initial provisioning.

Component machines cannot be added or removed after initial provisioning.

vRealize Automation defines startup and shutdown order.

The vApp template defines startup and shutdown order.

For both, access to the component portal for Microsoft Remote Desktop Protocol, Virtual Network Computing, and SSH depends on the guest and console and the endpoint.