You can increase the vRealize Automation appliance primary disk size when site policies require that additional software be installed on the primary disk.

About this task

Additional software that is installed on the primary disk might consume space and leave insufficient resources free for vRealize Automation operations such as upgrades.

Prerequisites

This procedure requires an additional Linux virtual machine, separate from the vRealize Automation appliance.

Caution:

Proceed very carefully. Your changes might cause data loss if you make mistakes while entering commands to reconfigure the disk.

Procedure

  1. Use the vSphere client to shut down the vRealize Automation appliance virtual machine.
  2. After the virtual machine is completely shut down, navigate to its hardware properties.
  3. Select the disk to increase, and make note of the Disk File VMDK name and location for later. You can copy it as temporary text in Notepad, for example.
  4. In Disk Provisioning, increase the Provisioned Size. For example, increase the size from 15 GB to 50 GB.
  5. Locate your additional Linux virtual machine, and navigate to its hardware properties.
  6. Add the disk that you increased earlier, the disk from the vRealize Automation appliance.

    Use the saved VMDK name and location to browse datastores and find the disk.

  7. After the disk is added, take a snapshot of the spare Linux virtual machine, in case you need to recover from an error during disk reconfiguration.
  8. Log in to the spare Linux host as root.
  9. Locate the added disk by entering one of the following pairs of commands. Try host0, host1, or host2 until you find the disk.
    echo "- - -" > /sys/class/scsi_host/host0/scan
    dmesg | tail
      
    echo "- - -" > /sys/class/scsi_host/host1/scan
    dmesg | tail
      
    echo "- - -" > /sys/class/scsi_host/host2/scan
    dmesg | tail

    The disk appears when you see output similar to the following sample:

    sd 0:0:4:0: [sdx] Attached SCSI disk

    Important:

    Throughout the commands in this procedure, note and substitute your disk identifiers for the sdx examples.

  10. Open disk partition management by entering the following command. Substitute your disk for the sdx example.

    fdisk /dev/sdx

  11. To view the partition table, enter p.

    There should be two partitions, the primary bootable partition and the swap partition.

  12. Save the partition table output for later, by copying and pasting it to temporary text in an application like Notepad.
  13. Use the d command twice, to delete partition numbers 1 and 2. Partitions 1 and 2 are the primary and swap partitions, respectively.
  14. To create the new primary partition, enter n and p.
  15. For the partition number, enter 1.
  16. For the first sector, accept the default.

    The first sector should be 2048 or whatever the primary Start number was in the partition table that you saved earlier.

  17. Note the block size of the old swap partition, partition number 2, found in the partition table that you saved earlier. Subtract that block size from the proposed, default last sector number shown at the command prompt, and make a note of the difference.
  18. For the actual last sector value, enter the difference that you calculated in the previous step.
    Note:

    Do not accept the proposed, default last sector value, or the primary partition will use the entire disk and leave nothing for swap space.

  19. To make the new primary partition bootable, enter a and 1.
  20. To create the new swap partition, enter n and p.
  21. For the partition number, enter 2.
  22. For the first and last sectors, accept the defaults.
  23. Use the t command twice, to assign hex code IDs to partition numbers 1 and 2 so that they match the IDs found in the partition table that you saved earlier.
  24. To view the completed partitions, enter p.
  25. Verify the sectors, boot settings, and IDs, and enter w to write to disk and return to the root command prompt.
  26. To format the swap partition, enter the following command. Substitute your swap partition for the sdx2 example.

    mkswap /dev/sdx2

  27. To clean the primary partition, enter the following command. Substitute your primary partition for the sdx1 example.

    e2fsck -f /dev/sdx1

  28. To resize the primary partition, enter the following command. Substitute your primary partition for the sdx1 example.

    resize2fs -f /dev/sdx1

  29. To synchronize cached write operations to disk, enter the sync command a few times.
  30. Exit the root console session on the spare Linux virtual machine.
  31. Back in vSphere, navigate to the hardware properties of the spare Linux host, and remove the disk that you just finished configuring.

    Do not delete the disk, just remove it from the spare Linux virtual machine.

  32. Use the vSphere client to power on the original vRealize Automation appliance virtual machine. The reconfigured disk should still be part of the appliance.
  33. Verify that the swap space is available by logging in to the vRealize Automation appliance console as root, and entering the following command:

    swapon -s