VMware ESXi 8.0 Update 1 | 18 APR 2023 | GA ISO Build 21495797

Check for additions and updates to these release notes.

General Availability

This ESXi 8.0 Update 1 release is a General Availability (GA) designation. For more information on the vSphere 8.0 IA/GA Release Model of vSphere Update releases, see The vSphere 8 Release Model Evolves.

What's New

  • vSphere Configuration Profiles: vSphere 8.0 Update 1 officially launches vSphere Configuration Profiles, which allow you to manage ESXi cluster configurations by specifying a desired host configuration at the cluster level, automate the scanning of ESXi hosts for compliance to the specified Desired Configuration and remediate any host that is not compliant. vSphere Configuration Profiles require that you use vSphere Lifecycle Manager images to manage your cluster lifecycle, a vSphere 8.0 Update 1 environment, and Enterprise Plus or vSphere+ license. For more information, see Using vSphere Configuration Profiles to Manage Host Configuration at a Cluster Level.

  • With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, vSphere Distributed Services Engine adds support for:

    • NVIDIA BlueField-2 DPUs to server designs from Lenovo (Lenovo ThinkSystem SR650 V2).

    • 100G NVIDIA BlueField-2 DPUs to server designs from Dell.

    • UPTv2 for NVIDIA BlueField-2 DPUs.

    • AMD Genoa CPU based server designs from Dell.

  • Recorder for required privileges on vCenter Server workflows: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, to help you identify the minimal set of privileges that are required to run a vCenter Server workflow, you can record workflows and store the required privileges. You can use the stored data to create specific roles for users that run the same workflows, similar to templates. Searching through vCenter Server workflow recordings allows you to retrieve lists of privilege checks along with the corresponding sessions, users, managed objects, and operation IDs (opIDs). For more information, see Performing Privilege Checks Operations.

  • Support for heterogenous virtual graphics processing unit (vGPU) profiles on the same GPU hardware: vSphere 8.0 Update 1 removes the requirement that all vGPUs on a physical GPU must be of the same type and you can set different vGPU profiles, such as compute, graphics, or Virtual Desktop Infrastructure workload, on one GPU to save cost by higher GPU utilization and reduced workload fragmentation.

  • Integration of VMware Skyline™ Health Diagnostics™ with vCenter: Starting with vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you can detect and remediate issues in your vSphere environment by using the VMware Skyline Health Diagnostics self-service diagnostics platform, which is integrated with the vSphere Client. For more information, see VMware Skyline Health Diagnostics for vSphere Documentation.

  • VM-level power consumption metrics: Starting with vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you as a vSphere admin can track power consumption at a VM level to support the environmental, social, and governance goals of your organization.

  • NVSwitch support: vSphere 8.0 Update 1 adds support to up to 8 GPUs with NVSwitch connections between them on a single ESXi host. With the NVSwitch technology, you can run high-performance computing (HPC) and AI applications such as deep learning, scientific simulations, and big data analytics, which require multiple GPUs working together in parallel.

  • Okta Identity Federation for vCenter: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you can configure vCenter Server Identity Provider Federation for Okta as an external identity provider. For more information, see Configure vCenter Server Identity Provider Federation for Okta.

  • Support for Fault Tolerance of virtual machines that use a virtual TPM (vTPM) module: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you can use FT for VMs with a vTPM module to ensure continuous availability and security for your mission critical VMs.

  • Quick Boot support for servers with TPM 2.0 chips: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you no longer need to disable TPM 2.0 for Quick Boot, which allows you to save time and eliminate security gaps.

  • vSphere API for Storage Awareness (VASA) version 5 for vSphere Virtual Volumes: VASA version 5 for vSphere Virtual Volumes enhances security, certification management for multi vCenter deployments, and usability support. VASA version 5 deprecates self-signed certificates but provides backward compatibility support for earlier VASA versions. Before upgrading to ESXi 8.0 Update 1, see VMware knowledge base article 91387 to ensure continued availability of vSphere Virtual Volumes datastores.

  • Sidecar files become regular files in Config-vVol instead of vSphere Virtual Volumes objects: To improve scalability and performance of vSphere Virtual Volumes, starting with vSphere 8.0 Update 1, sidecar files are no longer vSphere Virtual Volumes objects but regular files in Config-vVol. When sidecar files are created as vSphere Virtual Volumes objects, for solutions such as First Class Disk (FCD) that create a large number of small sidecar files, they can cause an overhead of VASA operations such as binding and unbinding the volumes to a protocol endpoint. Creating sidecar files under the Config-vVol home directory removes such overhead from VASA and storage.

    After updating to ESXi 8.0 Update 1, new virtual machines, or virtual disks in the Config-vVol namespace are not supported on ESXi hosts of earlier versions. For more information and resolution, see VMware knowledge base article 90791.

  • Increased default capacity for vSphere Virtual Volumes objects of type Config-vVol: Starting with vSphere 8.0 Update 1, to allow the use of folders over vSphere Virtual Volumes datastores as content repositories, vSphere Virtual Volumes objects of type Config-vVol are created by default as thin-provisioned 255 GB, up from 4 GB in earlier releases. Also, starting with ESXi 8.0 Update 1, Config-vVol objects use VMFS-6 format instead of VMFS-5.

  • NVMe over TCP support for vSphere Virtual Volumes:  vSphere 8.0 Update 1 adds NVMe over TCP support for vSphere Virtual Volumes.

  • Extended XCOPY support: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you can use EXTENDED COPY (XCOPY) commands to optimize the data copy between VMFS datastores that are in different storage arrays, not only between datastores within the same array. XCOPY operations across storage arrays are supported only for VMFS 6 datastores and allow you to offload, migrate and clone workloads. While ESXi enables this feature, the actual data migration across the arrays must be implemented on the storage array side. For more information on how to use SCSI T10 commands, see Managing Hardware Acceleration on Block Storage Devices.

  • New file type for OSDATA volumes on SSD devices: vSphere 8.0 Update 1 adds a new file system type, VMFSOS, specifically for the ESX-OSData system partition on local SSD devices, which allows you to continue using virtual flash resources on other devices. The new file type prevents cases when you format an ESX-OSData volume on a local SSD device, and fsType returns a file of type Virtual Flash File System (VFFS). As a result, the disk backing of the ESX-OSData volume is listed under the Virtual Flash resources in vCenter, but such a disk belongs to the ESX-OSData volume and is not a part of the Virtual Flash resource pool.

  • NFS traffic isolation enhancements: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, to isolate NFS traffic, you can bind an NFS3 datastore on an NFS share over the network to a VM kernel adaptor on an ESXi host from a cluster. VMKNIC port binding is not supported in this release for vSphere Virtual Volumes datastores backed with NFS3 configurations. For more information, see Configure VMkernel Binding for NFS 3 Datastore.

  • Fourfold increase in NVMe-oF namespace capacity: Starting with vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you can use 32 paths to a NVMe-oF namespace from 8 in earlier releases.

  • Support for end-to-end NVMe stack without protocol translation: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, the Pluggable Storage Architecture (PSA) extends NVMe capabilities to support end-to-end NVMe stack without any protocol translation in any of the layers.

    vSphere 8.0 Update 1 also extends NVMe functionality by adding support for third-party multi-pathing plug-ins to control and manage NVMe arrays.

  • Increased maximum for Windows Server Failover Clusters (WSFC): vSphere 8.0 Update 1 increases the maximum WSFC clusters per ESXi host to 16 from 3.

  • Scale the number of NVMe over TCP adapters: vSphere 8.0 Update 1 increases the number of NVMe over TCP storage adapters per ESXi host to 8 from 2 to allow more redundancy and better bandwidth.

  • Support hot-add and hot-remove for VMDirectPath I/O devices: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, by using vSphere API you can add or remove a VMDirectPath I/O device without powering off VMs. For more information, see Hot-add Support for VMDirectPath I/O Devices.

  • Increased number of PCI passthrough devices per VM: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you can add up to 64 PCI passthrough devices per VM, up from 32 in previous releases, to allow better support for Virtualized Radio Access Network (vRAN) use cases.

  • Local depot overrides for Remote Office and Branch Office (ROBO) standalone ESXi hosts: Starting with vSphere 8.0 Update 1, to meet demand of certain business use cases, you can manage local depot overrides for Remote Office and Branch Office (ROBO) standalone ESXi hosts in the vSphere Client and by using the vSphere Automation API. For more information, see Manage Depot Overrides for a Cluster or a Standalone Host.

  • Advanced filters in the vSphere Client: With vSphere 8.0 Update 1, in addition to the existing quick filter option, you can set advanced filters on most inventory objects in the vSphere Client, such as VM lists, Hosts and Clusters, Datastores, and linked vCenters. You can use strings, such as Name, Status, and Guest OS, and enumerations, such as IP address. To refine your filters, you can use various logical operators and 2 conditions.

  • Increased maximum number of NFSv3 datastores that can be mounted with multiple connections: Starting with vSphere 8.0 Update 1, you can configure up to 8 connections to NFSv3 datastores on an ESXi host, from 1 in earlier releases, and have up to 256 connections used by the NFSv3 datastores on the host, depending on the combination of the number of datastores and the number of connection configured for each datastore. For more information, see VMware knowledge base article 91481.

  • HTTP/JSON-based wire protocol as an alternative to SOAP/XML: vSphere 8.0 Update 1 adds support for a new HTTP/JSON-based wire protocol as an alternative to SOAP/XML. The new protocol is described using the industry standard OpenAPI specification, version 3.0, and you can use it to access the popular VIM APIs. For more information, see the OpenAPI schema and Web Services Programming Guide, part of the vSphere Management SDK.

  • This release resolves CVE-2023-1017. VMware has evaluated the severity of this issue to be in the low severity range with a maximum CVSSv3 base score of 3.3.

  • This release resolves CVE-2023-1018. VMware has evaluated the severity of this issue to be in the low severity range with a maximum CVSSv3 base score of 3.3.

Earlier Releases of ESXi 8.0

New features, resolved, and known issues of ESXi are described in the release notes for each release. Release notes for earlier releases of ESXi 8.0 are:

For internationalization, compatibility, and open source components, see the VMware vSphere 8.0 Release Notes.

Patches Contained in This Release

Patch for VMware ESXi 8.0 Update 1

This release of ESXi 8.0 Update 1 delivers the following patches:

Build Details

Download Filename:

VMware-ESXi-8.0U1-21495797-depot.zip

Build:

21495797

Download Size:

583.5 MB

sha256checksum:

68d9b58c9a00ec63fd899cda1a3d044d1fb0f2ee353bcf9c8e163483977f5d7c

Host Reboot Required:

Yes

Virtual Machine Migration or Shutdown Required:

Yes

Rollup Bulletin

This rollup bulletin contains the latest VIBs with all the fixes after the initial release of ESXi 8.0.

Bulletin ID

Category

Severity

ESXi80U1-21495797

Bugfix

Critical

Image Profiles

VMware patch and update releases contain general and critical image profiles. Application of the general release image profile applies to new bug fixes.

Image Profile Name

ESXi-8.0U1-21495797-standard-7698281098777227235

ESXi-8.0U1-21495797-no-tools1278187871193924799

ESXi Image

Name and Version

Release Date

Category

Detail

ESXi_8.0.1-0.0.21495797

04/18/2023

General

Bugfix image

For information about the individual components and bulletins, see the Product Patches page and the Resolved Issues section.

Patch Download and Installation

For details on updates and upgrades by using vSphere Lifecycle Manager, see About vSphere Lifecycle Manager and vSphere Lifecycle Manager Baselines and Images. You can also update ESXi hosts without the use of vSphere Lifecycle Manager by using an image profile. This requires that you manually download the patch offline bundle ZIP file from the VMware download page or the Product Patches page and use the esxcli software profile update command. For more information, see the Upgrading Hosts by Using ESXCLI Commands and the VMware ESXi Upgrade guide.

Installation and Upgrade Notes for This Release

Before upgrading to VASA version 5, refer to VMware knowledge base article 91387 to ensure continued availability of your vSphere Virtual Volumes datastores.

Compatibility

Newly created virtual machines or virtual disks of version ESXi 8.0 Update 1 in the Config-vVol namespace of vSphere Virtual Volumes are not supported on ESXi hosts of earlier versions. For more information and resolution, see VMware knowledge base article 90791.

Resolved Issues

Networking Issues

  • First Class Disk (FCD) sync might fail on NFSv3 datastores and you see inconsistent values in Govc reports

    A rare file corruption issue might occur when multiple ESXi hosts do a simultaneous file append operation on an NFSv3 datastore. As a result, if you use the Govc open source command-line utility to perform administrative actions on a vCenter instance, you might see reports with inconsistent values. For example, if you run the command govc disk.ls to list all FCDs in a newly created datastore, you see a different number of disks from what you expect.

    This issue is resolved in this release.

Installation, Upgrade, and Migration Issues

  • If the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMPA) is not active, ESXi host reboot might take long after upgrading to vSphere 8.0 and later

    If ICMPA is not active on the NFS servers in your environment, after upgrading your system to vSphere 8.0 and later, ESXi hosts reboot might take an hour to complete, because restore operations for NFS datastores fail. NFS uses the vmkping utility to identify reachable IPs of the NFS servers before executing a mount operation and when ICMP is not active, mount operations fail.

    This issue is resolved in this release. To remove dependency on the ICMP protocol to find reachable IPs, the fix adds socket APIs to ensure that IPs on a given NFS server are available.

Miscellaneous Issues

  • The autocomplete attribute in forms for web access is not disabled on password and username fields

    Your remote web server might contain an HTML form field that has an input of type password and username where the autocomplete attribute is not set to off. As a result, you might see a warning by security scanners such as AutoComplete Attribute Not Disabled for Password in Form Based Authentication. The setting of the autocomplete attribute to on does not directly put a risk on web servers, but in certain browsers, user credentials in such forms might be saved and potentially lead to a loss of confidentiality.

    This issue is resolved in this release. The fix makes sure the attribute autocomplete is set to off in password and username fields to prevent browsers from caching credentials.

Known Issues

Installation, Upgrade, and Migration Issues

  • If you update your vCenter to 8.0 Update 1, but ESXi hosts remain on an earlier version, vSphere Virtual Volumes datastores on such hosts might become inaccessible

    Self-signed VASA provider certificates are no longer supported in vSphere 8.0 and the configuration option Config.HostAgent.ssl.keyStore.allowSelfSigned is set to false by default. If you update a vCenter instance to 8.0 Update 1 that introduces vSphere APIs for Storage Awareness (VASA) version 5.0, and ESXi hosts remain on an earlier vSphere and VASA version, hosts that use self-signed certificates might not be able to access vSphere Virtual Volumes datastores or cannot refresh the CA certificate.

    Workaround: Update hosts to ESXi 8.0 Update 1. If you do not update to ESXi 8.0 Update 1, see VMware knowledge base article 91387.

Miscellaneous Issues

  • You cannot mount an IPv6-based NFS 3 datastore with VMkernel port binding by using ESXCLI commands

    When you try to mount an NFS 3 datastore with an IPv6 server address and VMkernel port binding by using an ESXCLI command, the task fails with an error such as:

    [:~] esxcli storage nfs add -I fc00:xxx:xxx:xx::xxx:vmk1 -s share1 -v volume1

    Validation of vmknic failed Instance(defaultTcpipStack, xxx:xxx:xx::xxx:vmk1) Input(): Not found:

    The issue is specific for NFS 3 datastores with an IPv6 server address and VMkernel port binding.

    Workaround: Use the vSphere Client as an alternative to mount IPv6-based NFSv3 datastores with VMkernel port binding.

  • RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) traffic might fail in Enhanced Networking Stack (ENS) and VLAN environment, and a Broadcom RDMA network interface controller (RNIC)

    The VMware solution for high bandwidth, ENS, does not support MAC VLAN filters. However, a RDMA application that runs on a Broadcom RNIC in an ENS + VLAN environment, requires a MAC VLAN filter. As a result, you might see some RoCE traffic disconnected. The issue is likely to occur in a NVMe over RDMA + ENS + VLAN environment, or in an ENS+VLAN+RDMA app environment, when an ESXi host reboots or an uplink goes up and down.

    Workaround: None

Networking Issues

  • Auto discovery of NVMe Discovery Service might fail on ESXi hosts with NVMe/TCP configurations

    vSphere 8.0 adds advanced NVMe-oF Discovery Service support in ESXi that enables the dynamic discovery of standards-compliant NVMe Discovery Service. ESXi uses the mDNS/DNS-SD service to obtain information such as IP address and port number of active NVMe-oF discovery services on the network. However, in ESXi servers with NVMe/TCP enabled, the auto discovery on networks configured to use vSphere Distributed Switch might fail. The issue does not affect NVMe/TCP configurations that use standard switches.

    Workaround: Use the command esxcli nvme fabrics discover -a vmhbaX -D to manually gerenate the mDNS packets.

  • ESXi reboot takes long due to NFS server mount timeout

    When you have multiple mounts on an NFS server that is not accessible, ESXi retries connection to each mount for 30 seconds, which might add up to minutes of ESXi reboot delay, depending on the number of mounts.

    Workaround: ESXi Update 8.0 Update 1 adds a configurable option to override the default mount timeout: esxcfg-advcfg -s <timeout val> /NFS/MountTimeout. For example, if you want to reconfigure mount timeout to 10 seconds, you can run the following command: - esxcfg-advcfg -s 10 /NFS/MountTimeout. Use the command esxcfg-advcfg -g /NFS/MountTimeout to verify the current configured mount timeout.

Known Issues from Previous Releases

Installation, Upgrade, and Migration Issues

  • If you apply a host profile using a software FCoE configuration to an ESXi 8.0 host, the operation fails with a validation error

    Starting from vSphere 7.0, software FCoE is deprecated, and in vSphere 8.0 software FCoE profiles are not supported. If you try to apply a host profile from an earlier version to an ESXi 8.0 host, for example to edit the host customization, the operation fails. In the vSphere Client, you see an error such as Host Customizations validation error.

    Workaround: Disable the Software FCoE Configuration subprofile in the host profile.

  • You cannot use ESXi hosts of version 8.0 as a reference host for existing host profiles of earlier ESXi versions

    Validation of existing host profiles for ESXi versions 7.x, 6.7.x and 6.5.x fails when only an 8.0 reference host is available in the inventory.

    Workaround: Make sure you have a reference host of the respective version in the inventory. For example, use an ESXi 7.0 Update 2 reference host to update or edit an ESXi 7.0 Update 2 host profile.

  • VMNICs might be down after an upgrade to ESXi 8.0

    If the peer physical switch of a VMNIC does not support the auto negotiate option, or the option is not active, and the VMNIC link is set down and then up, the link remains down after upgrade to or installation of ESXi 8.0.

    Workaround: Use either of these 2 options:

    1. Enable the option media-auto-detect in the BIOS settings by navigating to System Setup Main Menu, usually by pressing F2 or opening a virtual console, and then Device Settings > <specific broadcom NIC> > Device Configuration Menu > Media Auto Detect. Reboot the host.

    2. Alternatively, use an ESXCLI command similar to: esxcli network nic set -S <your speed> -D full -n <your nic>. With this option, you also set a fixed speed to the link, and it does not require a reboot.

  • If a vCenter Server Security Token Service (STS) refresh happens during upgrade to ESXi 8.0, the upgrade might fail

    In vSphere 8.0, vCenter Single Sign-On automatically renews a VMCA-generated STS signing certificate. The auto-renewal occurs before the STS signing certificate expires and before triggering the 90-day expiration alarm. However, in long-running upgrade or remediation tasks by using a vSphere Lifecycle Manager image on multiple ESXi hosts in a cluster, vSphere Lifecycle Manager might create a cache of STS certificates internally. In very rare cases, if an STS certificates refresh task starts in parallel with the long-running upgrade or remediation task, the upgrade task might fail as the STS certificates in the internal cache might be different from the refreshed certificates. After the upgrade task fails, some ESXi hosts might remain in maintenance mode.

    Workaround: Manually exit any ESXi hosts in maintenance mode and retry the upgrade or remediation. Refreshing or importing and replacing the STS signing certificates happens automatically and does not require a vCenter Server restart, to avoid downtime.

  • After upgrade to ESXi 8.0, you might lose some nmlx5_core driver module settings due to obsolete parameters

    Some module parameters for the nmlx5_core driver, such as device_rss, drss and rss, are deprecated in ESXi 8.0 and any custom values, different from the default values, are not kept after an upgrade to ESXi 8.0.

    Workaround: Replace the values of the device_rss, drss and rss parameters as follows:

    • device_rss: Use the DRSS parameter.

    • drss: Use the DRSS parameter.

    • rss: Use the RSS parameter.

  • Second stage of vCenter Server restore procedure freezes at 90%

    When you use the vCenter Server GUI installer or the vCenter Server Appliance Management Interface (VAMI) to restore a vCenter from a file-based backup, the restore workflow might freeze at 90% with an error 401 Unable to authenticate user, even though the task completes successfully in the backend. The issue occurs if the deployed machine has a different time than the NTP server, which requires a time sync. As a result of the time sync, clock skew might fail the running session of the GUI or VAMI.

    Workaround: If you use the GUI installer, you can get the restore status by using the restore.job.get command from the appliancesh shell. If you use VAMI, refresh your browser.

Miscellaneous Issues

  • Reset or restore of the ESXi system configuration in a vSphere system with DPUs might cause invalid state of the DPUs

    If you reset or restore the ESXi system configuration in a vSphere system with DPUs, for example, by selecting Reset System Configuration in the direct console, the operation might cause invalid state of the DPUs. In the DCUI, you might see errors such as Failed to reset system configuration. Note that this operation cannot be performed when a managed DPU is present. A backend call to the -f force reboot option is not supported for ESXi installations with a DPU. Although ESXi 8.0 supports the -f force reboot option, if you use reboot -f on an ESXi configuration with a DPU, the forceful reboot might cause an invalid state.

    Workaround: Reset System Configuration in the direct console interface is temporarily disabled. Avoid resetting the ESXi system configuration in a vSphere system with DPUs.

  • If a PCI passthrough is active on a DPU during the shutdown or restart of an ESXi host, the host fails with a purple diagnostic screen

    If an active virtual machine has a PCI passthrough to a DPU at the time of shutdown or reboot of an ESXi host, the host fails with a purple diagnostic screen. The issue is specific for systems with DPUs and only in case of VMs that use PCI passthrough to the DPU.

    Workaround: Before shutdown or reboot of an ESXi host, make sure the host is in maintenance mode, or that no VMs that use PCI passthrough to a DPU are running. If you use auto start options for a virtual machine, the Autostart manager stops such VMs before shutdown or reboot of a host.

  • In a vCenter Server system with DPUs, if IPv6 is disabled, you cannot manage DPUs

    Although the vSphere Client allows the operation, if you disable IPv6 on an ESXi host with DPUs, you cannot use the DPUs, because the internal communication between the host and the devices depends on IPv6. The issue affects only ESXi hosts with DPUs.

    Workaround: Make sure IPv6 is enabled on ESXi hosts with DPUs.

  • You might see 10 min delay in rebooting an ESXi host on HPE server with pre-installed Pensando DPU

    In rare cases, HPE servers with pre-installed Pensando DPU might take more than 10 minutes to reboot in case of a failure of the DPU. As a result, ESXi hosts might fail with a purple diagnostic screen and the default wait time is 10 minutes.

    Workaround: None.

  • If you have an USB interface enabled in a remote management application that you use to install ESXi 8.0, you see an additional standard switch vSwitchBMC with uplink vusb0

    Starting with vSphere 8.0, in both Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) and HP Integrated Lights Out (ILO), when you have an USB interface enabled, vUSB or vNIC respectively, an additional standard switch vSwitchBMC with uplink vusb0 gets created on the ESXi host. This is expected, in view of the introduction of data processing units (DPUs) on some servers but might cause the VMware Cloud Foundation Bring-Up process to fail.

    Workaround: Before vSphere 8.0 installation, disable the USB interface in the remote management application that you use by following vendor documentation.

    After vSphere 8.0 installation, use the ESXCLI command esxcfg-advcfg -s 0 /Net/BMCNetworkEnable to prevent the creation of a virtual switch vSwitchBMC and associated portgroups on the next reboot of host.

    See this script as an example:

    ~# esxcfg-advcfg -s 0 /Net/BMCNetworkEnable

    The value of BMCNetworkEnable is 0 and the service is disabled.

    ~# reboot

    On host reboot, no virtual switch, PortGroup and VMKNIC are created in the host related to remote management application network.

  • If an NVIDIA BlueField DPU is in hardware offload mode disabled, virtual machines with configured SR-IOV virtual function cannot power on

    NVIDIA BlueField DPUs must be in hardware offload mode enabled to allow virtual machines with configured SR-IOV virtual function to power on and operate.

    Workaround: Always use the default hardware offload mode enabled for NVIDIA BlueField DPUs when you have VMs with configured SR-IOV virtual function connected to a virtual switch.

  • In the Virtual Appliance Management Interface (VAMI), you see a warning message during the pre-upgrade stage

    Moving vSphere plug-ins to a remote plug-in architecture, vSphere 8.0 deprecates support for local plug-ins. If your 8.0 vSphere environment has local plug-ins, some breaking changes for such plug-ins might cause the pre-upgrade check by using VAMI to fail.

    In the Pre-Update Check Results screen, you see an error such as:

    Warning message: The compatibility of plug-in package(s) %s with the new vCenter Server version cannot be validated. They may not function properly after vCenter Server upgrade.

    Resolution: Please contact the plug-in vendor and make sure the package is compatible with the new vCenter Server version.

    Workaround: Refer to the VMware Compatibility Guide and VMware Product Interoperability Matrix or contact the plug-in vendors for recommendations to make sure local plug-ins in your environment are compatible with vCenter Server 8.0 before you continue with the upgrade. For more information, see the blog Deprecating the Local Plugins :- The Next Step in vSphere Client Extensibility Evolution and VMware knowledge base article 87880.

  • You cannot remove a PCI passthrough device assigned to a virtual Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) node from a virtual machine with CPU Hot Add enabled

    Although by default when you enable CPU Hot Add to allow the addition of vCPUs to a running virtual machine, virtual NUMA topology is deactivated, if you have a PCI passthrough device assigned to a NUMA node, attempts to remove the device end with an error. In the vSphere Client, you see messages such as Invalid virtual machine configuration. Virtual NUMA cannot be configured when CPU hotadd is enabled.

    Workaround: See VMware knowledge base article 89638.

  • If you deploy a virtual machine from an OVF file or from the Content Library, the number of cores per socket for the VM is set to 1

    If you deploy a virtual machine from an OVF file or from the Content Library, instead of ESXi automatically selecting the number of cores per socket, the number is pre-set to 1.

    Workaround: You can manually set the number of cores per socket by using the vSphere Client. For more information, see VMware knowledge base article 89639.

  • If you configure a VM at HW version earlier than 20 with a Vendor Device Group, such VMs might not work as expected

    Vendor Device Groups, which enable binding of high-speed networking devices and the GPU, are supported only on VMs with HW version 20 and later, but you are not prevented to configure a VM at HW version earlier than 20 with a Vendor Device Group. Such VMs might not work as expected: for example, fail to power-on.

    Workaround: Ensure that VM HW version is of version 20 before you configure a Vendor Device Group in that VM.

Networking Issues

  • You cannot set the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) on a VMware vSphere Distributed Switch to a value larger than 9174 on a Pensando DPU

    If you have the vSphere Distributed Services Engine feature with a Pensando DPU enabled on your ESXi 8.0 system, you cannot set the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) on a vSphere Distributed Switch to a value larger than 9174.

    Workaround: None.

  • You see link flapping on NICs that use the ntg3 driver of version 4.1.3 and later

    When two NICs that use the ntg3 driver of versions 4.1.3 and later are connected directly, not to a physical switch port, link flapping might occur. The issue does not occur on ntg3 drivers of versions earlier than 4.1.3 or the tg3 driver. This issue is not related to the occasional Energy Efficient Ethernet (EEE) link flapping on such NICs. The fix for the EEE issue is to use a ntg3 driver of version 4.1.7 or later, or disable EEE on physical switch ports.

    Workaround: Upgrade the ntg3 driver to version 4.1.8 and set the new module parameter noPhyStateSet to 1. The noPhyStateSet parameter defaults to 0 and is not required in most environments, except they face the issue.

  • VMware NSX installation or upgrade in a vSphere environment with DPUs might fail with a connectivity error

    An intermittent timing issue on the ESXi host side might cause NSX installation or upgrade in a vSphere environment with DPUs to fail. In the nsxapi.log file you see logs such as Failed to get SFHC response. MessageType MT_SOFTWARE_STATUS.

    Workaround: Wait for 10 min and retry the NSX install or upgrade.

  • If you do not reboot an ESXi host after you enable or disable SR-IOV with the icen driver, when you configure a transport node in ENS Interrupt mode on that host, some virtual machines might not get DHCP addresses

    If you enable or disable SR-IOV with the icen driver on an ESXi host and configure a transport node in ENS Interrupt mode, some Rx (receive) queues might not work if you do not reboot the host. As a result, some virtual machines might not get DHCP addresses.

    Workaround: Either add a transport node profile directly, without enabling SR-IOV, or reboot the ESXi host after you enable or disable SR-IOV.

  • You cannot use Mellanox ConnectX-5, ConnectX-6 cards Model 1 Level 2 and Model 2 for Enhanced Network Stack (ENS) mode in vSphere 8.0

    Due to hardware limitations, Model 1 Level 2, and Model 2 for Enhanced Network Stack (ENS) mode in vSphere 8.0 is not supported in ConnectX-5 and ConnectX-6 adapter cards.

    Workaround: Use Mellanox ConnectX-6 Lx and ConnectX-6 Dx or later cards that support ENS Model 1 Level 2, and Model 2A.

  • Pensando DPUs do not support Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) on physical switch ports of ESXi hosts

    When you enable LLDP on an ESXi host with a DPU, the host cannot receive LLDP packets.

    Workaround: None.

Storage Issues

  • VASA API version does not automatically refresh after upgrade to vCenter Server 8.0

    vCenter Server 8.0 supports VASA API version 4.0. However, after you upgrade your vCenter Server system to version 8.0, the VASA API version might not automatically change to 4.0. You see the issue in 2 cases:

    1. If a VASA provider that supports VASA API version 4.0 is registered with a previous version of VMware vCenter, the VASA API version remains unchanged after you upgrade to VMware vCenter 8.0. For example, if you upgrade a VMware vCenter system of version 7.x with a registered VASA provider that supports both VASA API versions 3.5 and 4.0, the VASA API version does not automatically change to 4.0, even though the VASA provider supports VASA API version 4.0. After the upgrade, when you navigate to vCenter Server > Configure > Storage Providers and expand the General tab of the registered VASA provider, you still see VASA API version 3.5.

    2. If you register a VASA provider that supports VASA API version 3.5 with a VMware vCenter 8.0 system and upgrade the VASA API version to 4.0, even after the upgrade, you still see VASA API version 3.5.

    Workaround: Unregister and re-register the VASA provider on the VMware vCenter 8.0 system.

  • vSphere Storage vMotion operations might fail in a vSAN environment due to an unauthenticated session of the Network File Copy (NFC) manager

    Migrations to a vSAN datastore by using vSphere Storage vMotion of virtual machines that have at least one snapshot and more than one virtual disk with different storage policy might fail. The issue occurs due to an unauthenticated session of the NFC manager because the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) body exceeds the allowed size.

    Workaround: First migrate the VM home namespace and just one of the virtual disks. After the operation completes, perform a disk only migration of the remaining 2 disks.

  • You cannot create snapshots of virtual machines due to an error in the Content Based Read Cache (CBRC) that a digest operation has failed

    A rare race condition when assigning a content ID during the update of the CBRC digest file might cause a discrepancy between the content ID in the data disk and the digest disk. As a result, you cannot create virtual machine snapshots. You see an error such as An error occurred while saving the snapshot: A digest operation has failed in the backtrace. The snapshot creation task completes upon retry.

    Workaround: Retry the snapshot creation task.

vCenter Server and vSphere Client Issues

  • The Utilization view of resource pools and clusters might not automatically refresh when you change the object

    When you have already opened the Utilization view under the Monitor tab for a resource pool or a cluster and then you change the resource pool or cluster, the view might not automatically refresh. For example, when you open the Utilization view of one cluster and then select a different cluster, you might still see the statistics of the first cluster.

    Workaround: Click the refresh icon.

  • If you load the vSphere virtual infrastructure to more than 90%, ESXi hosts might intermittently disconnect from vCenter Server

    In rare occasions, if the vSphere virtual infrastructure is continuously using more than 90% of its hardware capacity, some ESXi hosts might intermittently disconnect from the vCenter Server. Connection typically restores within a few seconds.

    Workaround: If connection to vCenter Server accidentally does not restore in a few seconds, reconnect ESXi hosts manually by using vSphere Client.

  • In the vSphere Client, you do not see banner notifications for historical data imports

    Due to a backend issue, you do not see banner notifications for background migration of historical data in the vSphere Client.

    Workaround: Use the vCenter Server Management Interface as an alternative to the vSphere Client. For more information, see Monitor and Manage Historical Data Migration.

  • You see an error for Cloud Native Storage (CNS) block volumes created by using API in a mixed vCenter environment

    If your environment has vCenter Server systems of version 8.0 and 7.x, creating Cloud Native Storage (CNS) block volume by using API is successful, but you might see an error in the vSphere Client, when you navigate to see the CNS volume details. You see an error such as Failed to extract the requested data. Check vSphere Client logs for details. + TypeError: Cannot read properties of null (reading 'cluster'). The issue occurs only if you review volumes managed by the 7.x vCenter Server by using the vSphere Client of an 8.0 vCenter Server.

    Workaround: Log in to vSphere Client on a vCenter Server system of version 7.x to review the volume properties.

  • ESXi hosts might become unresponsive, and you see a vpxa dump file due to a rare condition of insufficient file descriptors for the request queue on vpxa

    In rare cases, when requests to the vpxa service take long, for example waiting for access to a slow datastore, the request queue on vpxa might exceed the limit of file descriptors. As a result, ESXi hosts might briefly become unresponsive, and you see a vpxa-zdump.00* file in the /var/core directory. The vpxa logs contain the line Too many open files.

    Workaround: None. The vpxa service automatically restarts and corrects the issue.

  • If you use custom update repository with untrusted certificates, vCenter Server upgrade or update by using vCenter Lifecycle Manager workflows to vSphere 8.0 might fail

    If you use a custom update repository with self-signed certificates that the VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA) does not trust, vCenter Lifecycle Manager fails to download files from such a repository. As a result, vCenter Server upgrade or update operations by using vCenter Lifecycle Manager workflows fail with the error Failed to load the repository manifest data for the configured upgrade.

    Workaround: Use CLI, the GUI installer, or the Virtual Appliance Management Interface (VAMI) to perform the upgrade. For more information, see VMware knowledge base article 89493.

Virtual Machine Management Issues

  • When you add an existing virtual hard disk to a new virtual machine, you might see an error that the VM configuration is rejected

    When you add an existing virtual hard disk to a new virtual machine by using the VMware Host Client, the operation might fail with an error such as The VM configuration was rejected. Please see browser Console. The issue occurs because the VMware Host Client might fail to get some properties, such as the hard disk controller.

    Workaround: After you select a hard disk and go to the Ready to complete page, do not click Finish. Instead, return one step back, wait for the page to load, and then click Next > Finish.

vSphere Lifecycle Manager Issues

  • If you use an ESXi host deployed from a host profile with enabled stateful install as an image to deploy other ESXi hosts in a cluster, the operation fails

    If you extract an image of an ESXi host deployed from a host profile with enabled stateful install to deploy other ESXi hosts in a vSphere Lifecycle Manager cluster, the operation fails. In the vSphere Client, you see an error such as A general system error occurred: Failed to extract image from the host: no stored copy available for inactive VIB VMW_bootbank_xxx. Extraction of image from host xxx.eng.vmware.com failed.

    Workaround: Use a different host from the cluster to extract an image.

  • You see error messages when try to stage vSphere Lifecycle Manager Images on ESXi hosts of version earlier than 8.0

    ESXi 8.0 introduces the option to explicitly stage desired state images, which is the process of downloading depot components from the vSphere Lifecycle Manager depot to the ESXi hosts without applying the software and firmware updates immediately. However, staging of images is only supported on an ESXi 8.0 or later hosts. Attempting to stage a vSphere Lifecycle Manager image on ESXi hosts of version earlier than 8.0 results in messages that the staging of such hosts fails, and the hosts are skipped. This is expected behavior and does not indicate any failed functionality as all ESXi 8.0 or later hosts are staged with the specified desired image.

    Workaround: None. After you confirm that the affected ESXi hosts are of version earlier than 8.0, ignore the errors.

  • A remediation task by using vSphere Lifecycle Manager might intermittently fail on ESXi hosts with DPUs

    When you start a vSphere Lifecycle Manager remediation on an ESXi hosts with DPUs, the host upgrades and reboots as expected, but after the reboot, before completing the remediation task, you might see an error such as:

    A general system error occurred: After host … remediation completed, compliance check reported host as 'non-compliant'. The image on the host does not match the image set for the cluster. Retry the cluster remediation operation.

    This is a rare issue, caused by an intermittent timeout of the post-remediation scan on the DPU.

    Workaround: Reboot the ESXi host and re-run the vSphere Lifecycle Manager compliance check operation, which includes the post-remediation scan.

VMware Host Client Issues

  • VMware Host Client might display incorrect descriptions for severity event states

    When you look in the VMware Host Client to see the descriptions of the severity event states of an ESXi host, they might differ from the descriptions you see by using Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) or Lenovo XClarity Controller (XCC). For example, in the VMware Host Client, the description of the severity event state for the PSU Sensors might be Transition to Non-critical from OK, while in the XCC and IPMI, the description is Transition to OK.

    Workaround: Verify the descriptions for severity event states by using the ESXCLI command esxcli hardware ipmi sdr list and Lenovo XCC.

Security Features Issues

  • If you use an RSA key size smaller than 2048 bits, RSA signature generation fails

    Starting from vSphere 8.0, ESXi uses the OpenSSL 3.0 FIPS provider. As part of the FIPS 186-4 requirement, the RSA key size must be at least 2048 bits for any signature generation, and signature generation with SHA1 is not supported.

    Workaround: Use RSA key size larger than 2048.

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