VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery | 07 SEP 2021

Check for additions and updates to these release notes.

What's New

VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery is VMware's on-demand disaster recovery service that is delivered as an easy-to-use SaaS solution and offers cloud economics to keep your disaster recovery costs under control.

These release notes provide information about VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery (commonly called VCDR) product features, system requirements and software support, caveats and limitations, and any known or fixed issues related to the service.

2 September 2021

30-minute RPO: Confidently protect your most critical virtual machines running on your on-premises datacenter with VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery by configuring protection schedules with Recovery Point Objectives (RPOs) as low as 30 minutes, so that the risk of data loss from unforeseen DR events is minimized. VMware vCenter Server and ESXi on the source site should be upgraded to 7.0 Update 2c-vcdr to enable 30-minute RPOs. See documentation on how to get the required patch and other caveats for this feature.

4 August 2021

  • Bring your existing recovery SDDC: Maximize your investment in VMware Cloud on AWS by using an existing SDDC created from the VMware Cloud console, for recovery with VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery. Clusters and hosts added to VMware Cloud DR from VMware Cloud console are automatically recognized by VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery.
  • User actions added to events list: View a log of user actions such as log in, log out, configuration changes, and DR Plan executions in the Monitor view of the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI. The user ID and the source IP address are shown for each item in the Events list, enhancing your ability to audit user actions.
  • Protect workloads running in VMware Cloud Foundation: Expand your DR strategy to include protection of your virtual machines running in VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) 3.0 and newer versions.
  • DR protection for up to 2500 VMs per-AWS region: Protect larger environments by replicating up to 2500 virtual machines to a single AWS region in a VMware Cloud organization. You might need to split 2500 VMs across multiple VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery cloud file systems for larger protected capacity scale. See VMware Configuration Maximum tool for operational scale limits of VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery.
  • Replication throughput in UI: See the network throughput of the replication data traffic between the source site and the target VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery cloud file system. The throughput can be viewed in the Dashboard Topology map and on the Protected Sites page in the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI.
  • AWS Europe (Milan) region: You can now protect and recover your vSphere virtual machines in the AWS Europe (Milan) region.

27 July 2021

Disaster Recovery in VMware Cloud Launchpad. Accelerate your Disaster Recovery implementation with step-by-step guidance, relevant tools and a rich set of resources using VMware Cloud Launchpad. Click on "Learn More" under "Disaster Recovery" to navigate to launch your DR journey. This experience is available to everyone without requiring login to VMware Cloud.

16 July 2021

Pilot deployment for AWS Seller of Record. You can now try VMware Cloud DR out as a "pilot" before committing to a term subscription, even when you have purchased it with AWS as seller of record. Pilot deployments are charged at a fixed hourly rate and include 5 TiB of protected capacity and 25 protected virtual machines. Any usage beyond these limits will incur charges at the applicable per-TiB overage and per-VM on-demand rates. Once you are done with your evaluation, create a 1-year or 3-year committed term subscription to seamlessly convert this to a standard deployment and continue using the service. Please refer to the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery pricing page for additional details.

23 June 2021

  • Inter-AZ DR in VMware Cloud on AWS: Protect your VMs running in VMware Cloud on AWS to a designated recovery Availability Zone within the same AWS region, ensuring your data stays in the same region even after recovery. See here for more information.
  • Cloud File System deployment wizard: Deploy the Cloud File System for replication and recovery using a self-service wizard in the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI. See here for more information.
  • SOC 2, Type 1 Compliance: System & Organization Control (SOC) Reports are independent, third-party examination reports that demonstrate how VMware Cloud DR achieves key compliance controls and objectives to meet SOC 2, Type 1 requirements. The purpose of these reports is to help you and your auditors understand the controls established to support operations and compliance.
  • Avoid full re-sync even when CBT is disabled on the protected site: Fall back to a fingerprint-based method to efficiently calculate the delta when Change Block Tracking (CBT) is disabled on the protected site. This helps to avoid a re-transfer of all the virtual machine data and reduces interruptions to DR protection.
  • Auto-exclude management virtual machines from protection groups: vSphere Cluster Services (vCLS) VMs, DRaaS Connector VMs and VMware Cloud on AWS management VMs are now automatically excluded from protection groups.
  • Capacity limit monitoring: View the currently protected storage capacity relative to the maximum capacity limit of the Cloud File System. This metric is displayed as a percentage value in the cloud file system information panel. See here for more information.
  • Usability enhancement: The global summary page now shows number of running DR plans.

7 May 2021

CSA Trusted Cloud Provider. VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery is now a Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) Trusted Cloud Provider and registered as a Security, Trust, Assurance and Risk (STAR) Level One service. CSA is an organization dedicated to defining best practices to help ensure a secure cloud computing environment. STAR Registry is a publicly accessibly registry that documents the security and privacy controls. You can find the VMware Cloud DR STAR Register listing, including the downloadable CAIQ here.

27 April 2021

The following new features are available or in preview for the new release:

Definitions

Available: Feature now available for use by applicable customers. May not be available in all AWS regions.

Preview: Feature released in preview to gather feedback. May not be available to all applicable customers or in all AWS regions*.

*We cannot guarantee that features marked as ‘Preview’ will become available within any particular time frame or at all. Make your purchase decisions only on the basis of features that are Available.

  • Pilot deployment: Try out VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery as a "pilot" before committing to a term subscription. Pilot deployments are charged at a fixed hourly rate and include 5 TiB of protected capacity and 25 protected virtual machines. Any usage beyond these limits will incur charges at the applicable per-TiB overage and per-VM on-demand rates. Once you are done with your evaluation, create a 1-year or 3-year committed term subscription to seamlessly convert this to a standard deployment and continue using the service. Please refer to the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery pricing page for additional details.
  • Monthly payment option for term subscriptions: Get additional payment flexibility with a new option to pay for 1-year or 3-year committed term subscriptions in monthly installment rather than paying for it all upfront. Please refer to the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery pricing page for additional details.
  • Faster replication: Achieve faster initial backup ingest and higher steady state replication throughput through several optimizations of the Scale-out Cloud File System and the DRaaS Connector. Improvements include parallel processing of multiple protection groups, improved selection of optimal Connector for remote sites, and automatic tuning of certain parameters.
  • Enhanced recovery performance: An accelerated cache within the Scale-out Cloud File System now enables enhanced performance of your recovered virtual machines and faster completion of the Storage vMotion to VMware Cloud on AWS. This functionality is fully managed by the service with no need for user configuration.
  • Cancellation option for replication in-progress: Exercise greater control over your ongoing protection operations with the ability to cancel a running snapshot task from the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI.
  • Direct Connect (Public VIF) for replication and failback traffic: Use AWS Direct Connect with public virtual interfaces (Public VIF) to carry replication, failback, and management traffic between your on-premises protected site and VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery over a high-bandwidth, low-latency network connection. For more details, please refer to this VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery documentation page.
  • Support for protected sites running vSphere 7.0 Update 2: You can now protect virtual machines in sites running vSphere 7.0 Update 2. Refer to the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix for the latest information on interoperability of VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery with other VMware solutions.
  • Choose seller of record for Recovery SDDC: Optimize your cloud spend by choosing between VMware or AWS as the seller of record while deploying your Recovery SDDC, regardless of the seller of record for VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery itself. For more details on your purchase options, please refer to the VMware Cloud DR documentation.
  • Custom user for protected vCenter registration (*Preview): Register the vCenter in your on-premises protected site using a custom vCenter user with the minimal set of permissions required by the DRaaS Connector for protection and replication operations. Manually update the user to add other permissions required for failback only when necessary.
  • Run recovered VMs off cloud filesystem (*Preview): Achieve faster failover times and failback sooner by recovering your virtual machines directly on the Scale Out Cloud File System and skipping the storage migration to VMware Cloud on AWS. The virtual machine storage continues to be served from the cloud filesystem. Before using this feature, please consult the Caveats and Limitations section below.

23 March 2021

  • Inter-region DR in VMware Cloud on AWS. Protect your virtual machines running in VMware Cloud on AWS across cloud regions using VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery. Deploy the DRaaS Connector on your VMware Cloud on AWS clusters to start replicating the virtual machines running there to a VMware Cloud DR instance in another VMware Cloud on AWS region. Use VMware Cloud DR's orchestrated recovery capabilities to perform DR tests and failovers in a VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC in the target region.
  • 2-host pilot light and recovery SDDCs. Lower your steady state DR costs by deploying an i3.metal 2-host VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC to serve as a pilot light cluster for VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery. For DR tests and failovers, scale up the pilot light SDDC into a full-sized recovery site by adding more clusters to it. After the test or failover, scale back down to the 2-host footprint by removing the additional recovery clusters.
  • New AWS regions. You can now protect and recover your vSphere virtual machines in the following additional AWS regions: Asia Pacific (Seoul), Europe (Stockholm), and South America (São Paulo).
  • Support for protected sites running vSphere 7.0 Update 1. You can now protect virtual machines in sites running vSphere 7.0 Update 1. Refer to the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix for the latest information on interoperability of VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery with other VMware solutions.
  • Multi-instance support for increased scalability. Deploy multiple instances of the scale-out cloud file system and multiple recovery SDDCs in the target region to protect a large volume of virtual machine data and a large number of virtual machines. Orchestrate company-wide DR testing and failovers from a single, federated VMware Cloud DR management console spanning across all instances.
  • HIPAA BAA. A HIPAA Business Associate Agreement (BAA) is available for VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery to help healthcare organizations stay in compliance while ensuring DR protection of their critical applications.
  • Enhanced replication resiliency. Benefit from increased resiliency of the replication process against transient network outages and temporary unavailability of the cloud file system due to cloud upgrades. The progress of a replication job is now saved periodically so that it can continue from that point onwards when the transient situation is resolved.

21 January 2021

  • New AWS region. You can now protect and recover your vSphere virtual machines in the Asia Pacific (Tokyo) AWS region.

17 December 2020

  • New AWS regions. You can now protect and recover your vSphere virtual machines in the following additional AWS regions: Europe (Ireland), Europe (Paris), and Asia Pacific (Mumbai).
  • Support for I3en hosts in Recovery SDDC: You can now provision I3en hosts in your Recovery SDDC and use them for recovery operations.
  • Support for multiple vSphere clusters in Recovery SDDC: You can now add multiple vSphere clusters to your Recovery SDDC to increase your recovery capacity.
  • Faster recovery. Failover now happens faster as virtual machines are powered on in parallel in batch sizes that scale with the number of hosts in your Recovery SDDC.
  • Use vSphere tags to configure protection groups. You can now define which virtual machines should be members of a protection group based on their vSphere tags. When backing up, any virtual machines with the tags you specify are dynamically associated with the protection group and included in the snapshot.
  • Preserve vSphere tags on VMs upon Recovery. The recovery process now preserves tags on recovered VMs that were associated with those VMs on the original protected site. The tags and their associated categories must be pre-configured on the recovery SDDC for successful failover.
  • Data transfer optimizations for failback and VM restore. In situations where incremental data transfer based on snapshot data is not possible during a failback or VM restore operation, VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery now leverages the VM content that already exists on the restore destination to speed up the failback or VM restore.
  • Consistent handling of time zones in UI. All timestamps shown in the UI now display using the user’s browser time zone setting. Protection Group schedules are still based on the protected site’s time zone. When this time zone is different from the user’s browser time zone setting, the UI indicates the protected site's time zone for reference.
  • Show progress of Recovery SDDC deployment and snapshot replication. The UI now provides progress status for Recovery SDDC deployment and snapshot replication, listing all running and completed tasks associated with these operations.
  • Support for protected sites running vSphere 7.0. You can now protect virtual machines in sites running vSphere 7.0. Refer to the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix for the latest information on interoperability of VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery with other VMware solutions.

20 October 2020 - Introducing VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery

Protect your vSphere virtual machines (VMs) to the cloud and recover them to VMware Cloud on AWS using VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery. Based on the scale-out cloud file system technology developed at Datrium, VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery helps lower the cost of disaster recovery by storing backups in cloud storage, and allows you to pay for recovery host capacity only when you want to conduct a disaster recovery test or perform a recovery.

VMware Cloud on AWS makes rapid recovery at scale possible with its "live mount" capability, which enables fast power-on of the recovered VMs in VMware Cloud on AWS without a long data rehydration process. A fully-featured SaaS-simple disaster recovery orchestrator is built-in to minimize the need for manual effort during recovery. The service is tightly integrated with VMware Cloud on AWS for efficient recovery and a consistent operational experience without error-prone VM format conversions.

For more information, visit our blog and FAQ.

Features of VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery include:

  • Available in US West (Oregon), US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (N. California), Europe (London), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Canada (Central), Asia Pacific (Singapore), and Europe (Frankfurt).
  • Option to maintain a small, pre-provisioned "pilot light" SDDC to run foundational components and further speed recovery
  • Continuous disaster recovery health checks every 30 minutes for increased reliability
  • End-to-end and daily data integrity checks of backup copies
  • Deep history of immutable snapshots for recovery from ransomware attacks
  • Audit-ready, detailed disaster recovery reports
  • Delta-based failback

WHATS NEW

System Requirements

  • VMware vSphere Compatibility. VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery is currently supported with on-premises vSphere 7.0, vSphere 6.7 and vSphere 6.5. For more information, see the VMware Product Interoperability Matrices.
  • DRaaS Connector VM Requirements. To deploy the DRaaS Connector VM, make sure that the vSphere site where you intend to deploy it has the following resources for the VM:
    • CPU: 8 GHz (reserved)
    • RAM: 12 GiB (reserved)
    • Disk: 100 GiB vDisk
    • Network connectivity: Between DRaaS Connector and vCenter Server and ESXi hosts, and between the DRaaS Connector and VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery
  • Browser support:
    • Windows: Google Chrome, Firefox, Windows Edge (latest versions)
    • MacOS: Google Chrome, Firefox (latest versions)

Caveats and Limitations

The following section lists current VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery caveats and limitations as of release date.

  • High-frequency snapshots. For a full list of caveats and limitation for using high-frequency snapshots, see here.
  • VMware Site Recover (VSR) and VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery do not support protecting the same VMs on the same DR target (SDDC). VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery will not be able to failover VMs protected by VSR on the same DR target (SDDC).
  • Two host (I3 type) Recovery SDDC deployments are not supported with VMware Cloud SDDC version 1.15.
  • On-premises networks connected to the recovery SDDC over VPN or Direct Connect cannot overlap the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery proxy network CIDR: 10.68.97.0/28.
  • When adding an existing SDDC for recovery, the SDDC:
    • Must be on SDDC version 1.12 or higher.
    • Cannot have stretched clusters.
    • Cannot be PCI-hardened.
    • Cannot be detached from VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery once it is added.
  • Leave VMs and files in cloud backup preview feature limitations:
    • When you select this option and perform a failover, the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery software cannot be upgraded until you fail back the VMs.
    • You cannot run two failover DR Plans at the same time that 1) both share some of the same VMs and 2) where both plans have storage migration set to 'Leave VMs in cloud backup'. To avoid this, run one DR Plan at a time when you select this option.
    • If you choose to Leave VMs and files in cloud backup when you fail over a DR Plan, make sure that if you want to fail back those VMs to a protected site, do not Storage vMotion those VMs. If you Storage vMotion the VMs, then you cannot fail them back.
  • VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery does not support the following:
    • VMs created by vSphere vApp(s)
    • Fault Tolerant VMs
    • Shared disks
    • VMs that use Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) disks for storage
  • For protected sites with more 1000 VMs, you might experience some responsiveness issues with the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI, such as slow loading of pages or windows when previewing protection group VM membership, creating and editing DR Plans, and during plan compliance checks.
  • VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery does not create backups of VM templates. If you include a VM template in a protection group, it will not be included in snapshots.
  • Recovery of VMs with an attached ISO does not include the ISO during backup or failover/failback.
  • If a VM is being protected by VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery and also being backed up by another VM backup solution that uses vSphere Storage APIs for Data Protection (VADP), and both solutions take a snapshot of the VM at exactly the same time, the snapshot will still be taken but that VM will not be included in the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery snapshot.
  • VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery does not support an internet proxy server between the DRaaS Connector and the cloud.
  • Protection groups queries based on vSphere tags are not supported on protected sites running vSphere 6.0. This means that if your protected site is running vSphere 6.0, you cannot create a tag query.

Stable SDDC Configuration

To ensure the health and availability of the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery Service Offering, do not change the following SDDC settings. Changing any of these settings could interfere with and potentially disrupt the delivery and functioning of the service.

  • Do not change SDDC default firewall rules. Changing the SDDC firewall could interrupt access from the SDDC to the SCFS or Orchestrator components. By default, when your SDDC is deployed its network will contain a set of pre-configured firewall rules which begin with the "CloudDR-SystemRule-" prefix. These firewall rules should not be deleted. SDDC Firewall rules with this prefix cannot be edited or deleted in the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI, but these rules can be edited and deleted in the VMware Cloud on AWS console UI. So, do not change or delete any of these SDDC firewall rules.
  • Do not rename your SDDC once you have deployed it.
  • Do not change network configuration on the proxy VM.
  • If you have enabled an authentication policy for your VMware Cloud organization, to either block or allow specific IP addresses, make sure that you do not accidentally block or disallow the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery Orchestrator and cloud file system IP addresses. To find these IP addresses, see Service Public IP Addresses.
  • The following operations should only be done from the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI, not from the VMC console:
    • Deploy a Recovery SDDC
    • Delete a Recovery SDDC

Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) Support

VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery can provide disaster recovery protection for VMs that run on Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI), as well as the other types of software needed to enable the virtual technologies (e.g., Active Directory, connection servers, etc.). In this release, the following are not supported for VDI:

  • AppVolumes Writable Volumes
  • Modifying AppVolumes AppStacks once failed over
  • Modifying the Horizon Golden Master image once failed over.

Resolved Issues

  • FIXED Default management gateway rule for Recovery SDDC opened HTTPS access to VMware Cloud on AWS vCenter

    Some VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery organization owners might have received security notification from VMware Cloud indicating that their recovery SDDC management gateway has a firewall rule allowing unrestricted access to vCenter. This patch corrects the issue by replacing the rule with two new rules that restrict HTTPS traffic to vCenter from only VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery components. The fix removes this management gateway firewall rule that previously allowed vCenter access to Any. (For information about SDDC firewall rules, see Create a Firewall Rule for Public IP Addresses Accessing vCenter.)

  • FIXED Unmounted datastore after adding second cluster to a Recovery SDDC

    In some cases, when adding a second cluster to a Recovery SDDC, the NFS datastore 'ds01' did not mount. (This NFS datastore is created exclusively to expose VM backups to the Recovery SDDC to facilitate disaster recovery.) This has been fixed.

  • FIXED Windows Server VMs failed to recover when IP addresses were configured to be remapped during recovery

    In one environment, two Windows Server VMs failed to recover when their IP addresses should have been remapped as part of the failover operation. This has been fixed.

  • FIXED vCenter registration failed with unknown error

    During vCenter registration for an on-premises protected site, an "unknown error" was displayed in a dialog box and the operation failed. This issue was possibly related to time synchronization for the DRaaS Connector. This issue is now fixed.

Known Issues

  • NEW Delete Recovery SDDC Error

    In some instances when a user deletes a Recovery SDDC, an error sometimes displays, even if the deletion was successful.

    If you see this behavior, please contact VMware support to confirm that the Recovery SDDC was deleted successfully.

  • Unable to deploy new Recovery SDDC because previous Recovery SDDC was deleted using the VMC console

    In some cases, a user was not able to deploy a new Recovery SDDC because the user had previously deleted it from the VMware Cloud on AWS console, which is not supported. Recovery SDDCs should only be deployed and deleted using the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery UI.

    Workaround: If you are unable to deploy a new Recovery SDDC, please contact VMware Support.

  • DRaaS Connector offline and inoperable after being powered off more than two weeks

    If you power off a DRaaS Connector for more than 2 weeks, it will show as offline and potentially stop functioning.

    Workaround: If your DRaaS Connector is powered off more than two weeks, shows as offline and is not usable, contact VMware support for assistance, or deploy a new connector.

  • VM virtual hardware incompatibility for failover

    The most current version of VMware virtual hardware is 19, but VMware Cloud on AWS only supports up to version 17. (Visit VMware Cloud on AWS documentation to check the hardware version supported.) If you have a VM in your environment running virtual hardware version 18 or 19, and you fail over the VM to VMware Cloud on AWS, VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery will automatically downgrade those VMs to virtual hardware version 17.

    Workaround: To ensure that protected and recovered VMs have the same virtual hardware versions, and to avoid the automatic version downgrade, you can set the default hardware version for new VMs to 17 by following the instructions here.

  • Two-host Recovery SDDC deployments not supported with VMware Cloud SDDC software version 1.15

    You cannot deploy a 2-host Recovery SDDC for a VMware Cloud SDDC running software version 1.15.

  • vSphere warning during DRaaS Connector deployment

    When deploying the DRaaS Connector as an OVA in the vSphere client, vSphere will display an error stating that the connector OVA contains advanced configuration options and warns the user to proceed with caution. The mentioned advanced configuration is used by VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery to distinguish Connector VMs from customer VMs.

    Workaround: You can ignore this message and safely deploy the DRaaS Connector in your vSphere environment.

  • A VM with tags belonging to a protection group that uses only name or folder queries will not retain tag information after failover, and no compliance check is flagged

    If a VM with tags is backed up in a protection group using either a name pattern or folder membership query (but no tag query), the DR Plan compliance checks does not warn if the tags on the VM exist on the Recovery SDDC. When failover occurs, the VM will be recovered, but tag information will not be applied, and the tag will no longer exist on the VM.

    Workaround: You can make sure that the tags on the VM exist on the Recovery SDDC, or make sure the protection group also uses a tag query that matches the tag on the VM.

  • Re-adding a removed DRaaS Connector not supported

    If you remove a DRaaS Connector from a protected site, you cannot re-add the connector.

    Workaround: If you remove a DRaaS Connector from a protected site, re-deploy a new DRaaS Connector to replace it.

  • Cannot restore an individual VM back to the source site (protected SDDC) using the manual snapshot restore capability if the original VM was deleted

    When restoring an individual VM back to a protected VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC using the manual snapshot restore capability, if the original VM still exists in the SDDC vCenter, then you can restore the VM normally. If the original VM is deleted, you will not be able to restore the VM.

    Workaround: Do not delete the original VM.

  • Failover in a large scale environment failed with errors during VM power-on

    In some cases, a DR Plan failover was failing during recovery or while recovered VMs were being powered-on.

    Workaround: Retry the failover operation.

  • Unable to set default data store for failback DR Plan when a mapped host is not part of a cluster

    If a mapped compute resource (such as a host) in a failback DR Plan is not part of a cluster on an on-premies failback site, the default datastore cannot be mapped in the plan. Because the VMs in the plan have nowhere to fail back to, compliance checks will flag that the default datastore cannot be set, and when the plan is run it will display an error and fail to restore the VMs in the plan.

    Workaround: Create a new cluster on the on-premises protected site (if one doesn't exist) and then add the host to the cluster. Then you can edit the plan and map the default datastore for the failback plan.

  • Some special characters not supported in vSphere inventory object names

    VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery does not support the following special characters in vSphere inventory object names (such as VMs, VM templates, hosts, clusters, networks, datastores):

    { } [ ] \ % @ "

    Curly brackets, square brackets, backslash, percentage symbol, at symbol, and double quotation marks are not supported.

    For example, if you use any of these special characters in VM names, the VM will not be included in any protection group snapshots.

    Workaround: Do not use these special characters in your vSphere object inventory names.

  • VMs created on virtual hardware version 18 not supported

    VMs created on virtual hardware version 18 are not supported for failover or failback.

    Workaround: Ensure that your VMs are running virtual hardware version 17 or earlier.

  • After failover to the VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC, do not disable change block tracking (CBT) on any VMs in the VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC

    Changing CBT on VMs in your SDDC prevents the VM from being failed back in a timely manner with VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery. Reverting to a VMware VM snapshot in the VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC causes CBT to reset, resulting in drastically slower failback (go to https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/71155 for more information).

    Workaround: Do not revert to a VMware VM snapshot in the VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC, and do not change CBT settings for any VMs.

  • Protection groups with empty folders must be mapped properly in a DR Plan, or a failover will fail

    If one of the folders is empty when a snapshot of a protection group is taken, you must explicitly map that empty folder to a failover target in a DR Plan, or else that plan fails to complete during a failover.

  • Failover terminated after membership change leaves protection group in bad state

    During failover of a DR Plan, the folder membership and vCenter Server membership of the protection group are changed, and if a user terminates the DR plan failover after the membership change, the protection group is put into a bad state, rendering it unable to be edited or fixed.

    Workaround: If this occurs in your environment, contact VMware Support to correct the protection group membership.

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